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The Urban PulpitNew York City and the Fate of Liberal Evangelicalism$
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Matthew Bowman

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199977604

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977604.001.0001

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The Revised Version

The Revised Version

Scripture and the Rise of Liberal Evangelicalism

Chapter:
(p.85) 3 The Revised Version
Source:
The Urban Pulpit
Author(s):

Matthew Bowman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977604.003.0004

Chapter 3 describes the conflicts over scripture in the last two decades of the nineteenth century, focusing particularly on the Revised Version of the Bible, of which Testaments appeared in 1881 and 1885. The translators of the Revised Version still trusted in the power of the verbal Word of God and felt that a more accessible translation would reignite evangelism in the city. However, by providing an alternative to the King James Version they also, inadvertently, separated the words of any given text from the eternal and divine Word. Suddenly, there were multiple Protestant Bibles in New York City, and the sense of discontent was palpable. Charles Briggs, a professor of scripture at Union Theological Seminary, seized upon this disassociation to propound a new way of interpreting scripture: as a model for action rather than a collection of truths.

Keywords:   Bible, Translation, Modernism, Typology, King James Version

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