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Disability, Culture, and Development
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Disability, Culture, and Development: A Case Study of Japanese Children at School

Misa Kayama and Wendy Haight

Abstract

This book considers a key moment in the history of how disabilities are envisioned in Japan: the transition between two different understandings of what it means when children have difficulties learning in school. After the special education reform in 2007, Japanese children with mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities, including learning disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, and high functioning autism, became eligible to receive special education services. Then, children formerly viewed as “difficult” or “slow” were officially recognized as having “disabilities” and in n ... More

Keywords: children, special education, Japan, culturally-sensitive practice, stigma, mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities, ethnography, developmental cultural psychology, school social work

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2013 Print ISBN-13: 9780199970827
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199970827.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Misa Kayama, author
School of Social Work, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Wendy Haight, author
School of Social Work, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities