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Ancestral Landscapes in Human EvolutionCulture, Childrearing and Social Wellbeing$
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Darcia Narvaez, Kristin Valentino, Agustin Fuentes, James J. McKenna, and Peter Gray

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199964253

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199964253.001.0001

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Batek Childrearing and Morality

Batek Childrearing and Morality

Chapter:
(p.108) 5 Batek Childrearing and Morality
Source:
Ancestral Landscapes in Human Evolution
Author(s):

Karen L. Endicott

Kirk M. Endicott

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199964253.003.0008

Research with the Batek people of Malaysia from the mid-1970s is reported. The Bateck largely followed a nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle but also traded forest products for cloth, metal goods and some food commodities. Childrearing practices through adolescence give a window into how these practices influence the personality of the adults and the culture generally. They describe socialization into non-aggression. The adults seem to have an understanding that the child will grow out of aggressive impulses and indeed they do without punishment or admonition. Adults generally display enthusiasm, a “confident independence,” a sense of responsibility to others, and a “cooperative autonomy,” with no apparent personality differences between males and females.

Keywords:   childrearing, Batek, morality

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