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Confluence of ThoughtMohandas Karamchand Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr.$

Bidyut Chakrabarty

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199951215

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199951215.001.0001

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(p.243) Bibliographical Notes and Select Bibliography

(p.243) Bibliographical Notes and Select Bibliography

Source:
Confluence of Thought
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Bibliography references:

Texts on Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. can be classified into three segments: in the first segment, the focus is on tracts written by Gandhi and King. These published texts provide very useful inputs for the work. The second segment contains published collected works, which are very exhaustive. In the case of Gandhi, most of his written texts have already been incorporated into the collected works that have been published by the Government of India and are also available online. King’s collected works are not complete yet; nonetheless, six volumes of King texts published so far are very pertinent to any scholarly work on King. The literature in the final segment includes the scholarly works on the sociopolitical ideas of Gandhi and King. Since this book is also a contextual study of the history of ideas, the books, articles, and other relevant written tracts focusing on the contexts have also been included in this segment. Judith Brown’s Gandhi’s Rise to Power: Indian Politics, 1915–1922 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1972) and Gandhi and Civil Disobedience: The Mahatma in Indian Politics, 1928–1934 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008) provide a very useful contextual study of the rise of Gandhi as an unquestionable leader of India’s freedom struggle. In the same fashion, two books on the American civil rights movement deserve mention. These are David J. Garrow, Bearing the Cross: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Christian Leadership Conference (New York: William Morrow and Company, 1986) and Taylor Branch, Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954–1963 (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1988).

Both Gandhi and King left an enormous number of written texts for posterity. One can thus easily identify specific sociopolitical ideas that are integral to their views. Gandhi wrote a partial autobiography (My Experiments with Truth), a political treatise (Hind Swaraj), a movement book (Satyagraha in South Africa), a few pamphlets, a very large number of articles in the two weeklies that he edited, namely, Indian Opinion (South Africa) and Young India (India), and an even larger number of letters to viceroys, fellow politicians, and disciples. Besides these, he delivered speeches at conferences, congresses, and at his regular prayer meetings. King also left a large body of writings for posterity. The Autobiography of Martin Luther King Jr., (New York: IPM in association with Warner Books, (p.244) 1998), edited by Clayborne Carson, is a balanced account of King’s life that provides useful insights into the period and also describes the evolution of King’s sociopolitical ideas. Other than this autobiography, King published six books. These included two collection of sermons, The Measure of a Man (1959) and Strength to Love (1963); a collection of radio addresses entitled The Trumpet of Conscience (1968); and three books that are “movement books.” The first movement book, Stride toward Freedom (1958), is a philosophical account of the Montgomery bus boycott, including a general outline and defense of the method of direct nonviolent protest. The second movement book, Why We Can’t Wait (1964), is a philosophical account of the 1963 Birmingham campaign for jobs and freedom. This text includes the famous “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” in which King offers a philosophical defence of nonviolence, addressed to the moderate white clergy. The last movement book was published in 1967 in anticipation of a national campaign against poverty. Entitled Where Do We Go from Here? Chaos of Community (1968), this posthumous publication is a complex interweaving of ideas and thoughts that evolved during the course of King’s struggle for equality and justice.

Besides their own writings, the other significant sources happen to be the compilation of their texts in the form of collected works. Available online, The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi (New Delhi: Publication Division, Government of India, (1958–1998)), are an important source of the Gandhian texts that I have used extensively in my work. Besides this official publication, Navjivan Publishing House published a six-volume set called Mahatma Gandhi: Selected Works in the centenary year of Gandhi’s birthday. Similarly, six volumes edited by Clayborne Carson, The Papers of Martin Luther King Jr. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992–2007), contain a minefield of information that is very useful in comprehending the complex nuances of the sociopolitical ideas of Martin Luther King Jr. with reference to the volatile American socioeconomic contexts.

Select Bibliography

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