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In Search of Jane AustenThe Language of the Letters$

Ingrid Tieken-Boon van Ostade

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199945115

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945115.001.0001

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(p.267) References

Source:
In Search of Jane Austen
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

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