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The Christian Century and the Rise of the Protestant Mainline$
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Elesha J. Coffman

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199938599

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199938599.001.0001

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The Formation of an Editor-Bishop

The Formation of an Editor-Bishop

Chapter:
(p.33) 2 The Formation of an Editor-Bishop
Source:
The Christian Century and the Rise of the Protestant Mainline
Author(s):

Elesha J. Coffman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199938599.003.0002

Though the Century’s Disciples of Christ roots had become nearly invisible by the middle of the twentieth century, this denominational background powerfully shaped the magazine’s editorial approach and sense of its place in public discourse. The rhetorical patterns on which so many readers of the Century remarked over the years—the forceful prose, the grand pronouncements, the curious mixture of ecumenism and provincialism—developed as the magazine sought to distinguish itself from its competitors within the brotherhood and to contend for the soul of the Disciples movement. Ultimately, the Century was unable to attract a sufficient readership among liberal Disciples and repositioned itself as an undenominational, liberal journal, the organ of the ecumenical cause.

Keywords:   Disciples of Christ, magazine, liberal, undenominational, ecumenical, The Christian Century

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