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Latin America's Multicultural MovementsThe Struggle Between Communitarianism, Autonomy, and Human Rights$
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Todd A. Eisenstadt, Michael S. Danielson, Moises Jaime Bailon Corres, and Carlos Sorroza Polo

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199936267

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199936267.001.0001

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The backlash against indigenous rights in Ecuador’s citizen’s revolution

The backlash against indigenous rights in Ecuador’s citizen’s revolution

Chapter:
(p.111) 5 The backlash against indigenous rights in Ecuador’s citizen’s revolution
Source:
Latin America's Multicultural Movements
Author(s):

Carmen Martínez Novo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199936267.003.0033

This chapter argues that the parallel processes of political centralization and privileging the extraction of natural resources to finance a stronger state that have taken place during the government of President Rafael Correa (2007-) are leading to a backlash against previously gained indigenous rights in Ecuador. This backlash is made possible by a preceding weakening of the indigenous movement through neo-liberal practices of co-optation. Both, disaffected mestizos and indigenous grassroots that did not see enough change in the previous period have been drawn to Correa’s project. Because collective autonomy is perceived as a threat to an increasingly centralized and authoritarian state and to its ability to use natural resource extraction from indigenous territories to finance itself, individual rights via anti-discrimination laws are being privileged over collective autonomy. However, without strong social movements and collective rights, it is unlikely that even the individual rights of marginalized people will be respected.

Keywords:   indigenous rights, indigenous movements, multiculturalism, Ecuador, natural resource extraction, Rafael Correa, collective autonomy

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