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The Globalization of Cost-Benefit Analysis in Environmental Policy$
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Michael A. Livermore and Richard L. Revesz

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199934386

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199934386.001.0001

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Assessing Potential Carbon Revenues from Reduced Forest Cover Loss in Liberia

Assessing Potential Carbon Revenues from Reduced Forest Cover Loss in Liberia

Chapter:
(p.293) 19 Assessing Potential Carbon Revenues from Reduced Forest Cover Loss in Liberia
Source:
The Globalization of Cost-Benefit Analysis in Environmental Policy
Author(s):

Jessica Donovan

Keith Lawrence

Christopher Neyor

Eduard Niesten

Eric Werker

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199934386.003.0019

The prospect of low-carbon economic development involves the valuation of myriad costs and benefits, and includes the consideration of a number of innovative proposals to spur growth without degrading environmental resources. This chapter describes Liberia’s wealth of forests and explains how a low-carbon development strategy for Liberia could include a number of cost-beneficial policies, the most obvious being a transition to more efficient agriculture. Other beneficial policies include accelerating the establishment of protected areas, ensuring that tree crop plantations are located on degraded land rather than forest areas, and introducing energy-efficient stoves for charcoal and fuel wood. The net benefits of changes to forestry policies are less clear, however: reducing the number of timber sales contracts would be cost-beneficial, but replacing commercial timber with carbon concessions is more marginal.

Keywords:   Liberia, low-carbon development, agriculture, forests, tree crop plantations, timber, carbon concessions

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