Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Narrative Complexity of Ordinary LifeTales from the Coffee Shop$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

William L. Randall

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199930432

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199930432.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 25 March 2019

Cigar in the Night

Cigar in the Night

Storying the Past

Chapter:
(p.132) Chapter 8 Cigar in the Night
Source:
The Narrative Complexity of Ordinary Life
Author(s):

William L Randall

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199930432.003.0008

This chapter looks into the narrative complexity of “the news,” and the centrality of “story” language—top story, breaking story, story behind the story, etc.—in reporting it, especially on TV and radio. Also discussed is the matter of how different networks give us different versions of key events, and the complex process whereby stories on the front page one day appear on the back page one week later, and then (eventually, maybe) make it into the history books. Recounting a story shared with him by one of his coffee shop chums about his father’s chance encounter with Winston Churchill during World War II, the author ends the chapter with reflections on history, both as the study of the past and as the past itself. Drawing on memories of times spent in France and Germany, the author explores how in so many respects history lives on, and “the past” is never settled.

Keywords:   news, media, history, memory compost heap, past

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .