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Rich People's MovementsGrassroots Campaigns to Untax the One Percent$
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Isaac Martin

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199928996

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199928996.001.0001

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The Temporary Triumph of Estate Tax Repeal

The Temporary Triumph of Estate Tax Repeal

Chapter:
(p.182) Chapter 8 The Temporary Triumph of Estate Tax Repeal
Source:
Rich People's Movements
Author(s):

Isaac William Martin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199928996.003.0009

The campaign to eliminate the federal estate tax revived in the mid-1990 under the leadership of skilled movement entrepreneurs who had experience in previous rich people’s movements. The most notable among them was Grover Norquist, who had begun his career as an organizer for the National Taxpayers Union in 1978. The policy threat that made many people receptive to the movement was a proposal to raise estate taxes to pay for long-term care insurance. The grassroots campaign ultimately got estate tax repeal on the federal agenda, and after the election of George W. Bush in 2000, repeal became law in the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001.

Keywords:   estate tax, Bush tax cuts, Grover Norquist, conservatism, Republican Party

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