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Sound and SafeA History of Listening Behind the Wheel$
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Karin Bijsterveld, Eefje Cleophas, Stefan Krebs, and Gijs Mom

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199925698

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199925698.001.0001

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Humming Engines and Moving Radio

Humming Engines and Moving Radio

Encapsulating the Listening Driver

Chapter:
(p.72) Chapter 3 Humming Engines and Moving Radio
Source:
Sound and Safe
Author(s):

Karin Bijsterveld

Eefje Cleophas

Stefan Krebs

Gijs Mom

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199925698.003.0003

This chapter tells, notably for Germany,how automotive journalists and car mechanics initially educated drivers to carefully listen to the humming engines and transmission clutter of their automobiles in order to notice and understand the causes of automotive problems. As soon as car mechanics developed into a full profession, however, drivers were told to restrict themselves to monitory listening and leave diagnostic listening to experts. This shift happened between the 1920s and 1950s, the same era in which in-built car radio became fashionable. Initially, car radio met with societal concern: would it endanger the attention span of drivers? Soon, however, car radio developed into a sonic companion for long drives, and, from the 1960s onwards, into a system regulating the emotions of drivers in difficult traffic situations. The listening driver thusturned away from the sound of their cars proper, but tothe encapsulating sound of car radio.

Keywords:   Automotive Journalists, Car Mechanics, Monitory Listening, Diagnostic Listening, Car Radio, Mood Regulation, Encapsulating Sound

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