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Roadshow!The Fall of Film Musicals in the 1960s$
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Matthew Kennedy

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199925674

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199925674.001.0001

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The Musical That Ate Hollywood

The Musical That Ate Hollywood

Chapter:
(p.10) Chapter 1 The Musical That Ate Hollywood
Source:
Roadshow!
Author(s):

Matthew Kennedy

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199925674.003.0001

This chapter begins with 20th Century-Fox’s decision to make a film version of the Broadway musical The Sound of Music. The studio was teetering on the edge of bankruptcy, and needed a hit. Veteran director William Wyler was approached to direct, but said no. West Side Story director Robert Wise accepted the job. Broadway star Julie Andrews was cast in the lead. The film was shot on location in Austria and at the Fox studios in Southern California. Andrews’s first film, the musical Mary Poppins, was released during the making of The Sound of Music, and was a huge hit. So, too, was Warner Bros.’ big-budget screen version of My Fair Lady. By the time of The Sound of Music’s release in early 1965, it was believed that film musicals were enjoying a great surge in popularity. When Music became the biggest moneymaker in film history, that belief was confirmed, and every studio proceeded to put big budget musicals into production.

Keywords:   Richard Zanuck, Darryl F. Zanuck, Julie Andrews, Robert Wise, The Sound of Music, 20th Century-Fox, film musicals, roadshow

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