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J. S. Bach at His Royal InstrumentEssays on His Organ Works$

Russell Stinson

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199917235

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199917235.001.0001

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(p.153) Appendix 1

(p.153) Appendix 1

Source:
J. S. Bach at His Royal Instrument
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

(p.153) Appendix 1

EXPLANATORY NOTE

The data contained in this appendix are taken from the records of the Paris Conservatory during César Franck's tenure there as professor of organ. Housed today at the Archives Nationales, Paris, these documents preserve the progress reports drafted by Franck in conjunction with the semester examinations taken by his pupils (AJ37 283–90) and the reports, which are not in Franck's hand, on the annual organ competitions at the school (AJ37 251–52). While Franck's reports have survived complete, there are no extant competition reports for 1872, 1873, 1877, 1878, 1880, 1883, 1885, 1886, or 1887. For each exam or competition, the appendix lists the students in the same order found in the conservatory records.1 Two students are known only by the surnames of “Rigaud” (January 1880) and “Fournier” (January 1887). The following commentary addresses, in roughly the order of performance, various issues surrounding the repertoire played by Franck's students at these events. Since chapter 5 of the present book covers the works by Bach that were played, the focus here will be on music by other composers.

1. Mendelssohn: Six Sonatas for the Organ, OP. 65

Within Franck's studio, the organ sonatas of Felix Mendelssohn were second in popularity only to the music of Bach. Franck taught these works to a total of nineteen pupils, literally from his first semester as organ professor to his last. (Only once, during the first semester of the 1886–87 (p.154) academic year, did he teach from the other organ collection by Mendelssohn that would have been known in France at this time, namely, the Three Preludes and Fugues for the Organ, op. 37.) During the 1870s, the first, third, and sixth sonatas were played to the exclusion of the other three, but by the end of the 1887–88 year, all six sonatas had been performed by at least two different pupils. The conservatory records attest to almost thirty student performances altogether.

When citing his students’ performances of these pieces, Franck often referred to a specific movement that was played, but in the case of Édouard Rouher's exam in January 1883 he referred to two movements from the sixth sonata, calling them Andante et Fugue. Rouher, therefore, essayed the fugue that concludes the variations on “Vater unser im Himmelreich” with which this work begins, and he most likely prefaced the fugue with the first variation in the set, marked by Mendelssohn as Andante sostenuto. Another possibility is that the fugue was coupled with the Andante that concludes the entire sonata, but this movement is not based on the “Vater unser” chorale, nor is it in the same key as the variations.

In his progress report on Henri Letocart in January 1889, Franck cited his pupil's repertory selection as the 1re partie de la sonate en ut min. No composer is given, which is consistent with how Franck normally lists works by Bach in these sources (due to the multitude of Bach works played, Franck tended to give just the work title, along with the corresponding volume, number, and sometimes even page number from the Peters edition). Here, though, the only Bach work Franck can be referring to is the second of the six trio sonatas (BWV 525–30), a collection that was basically neglected by Franck as an organ pedagogue. It makes infinitely more sense that he is citing Mendelssohn's C-minor organ sonata (No. 2), which four other Franck students are documented to have played during the 1880s.

Franck's two progress reports on Édouard Bopp, which cite that pupil's performances in 1888 of the fourth and fifth Mendelssohn sonatas, corroborate Bopp's amusing claim that at one meeting of the conservatory organ class, Franck himself “pumped the bellows” while Bopp “played a piece by Mendelssohn.”2 By way of explanation, it seems that the staff member appointed to blow the organ was so often absent that his duties were regularly assumed by the first student to arrive—a tradition that may have discouraged punctuality. But on the morning described by Bopp, he was the only one of the eight or nine pupils in attendance. Another Franck student who comes to mind in the context of organ blowing is Jean Tolbecque, who during the first semester of the 1874–75 academic year happened to play the first movement of the first Mendelssohn sonata.3 Tolbecque's habit, believe it or not, was to hide in the bellows chamber whenever he was unprepared to play, a tactic that accords with his mediocre record at the conservatory: Tolbecque studied with Franck for four whole years (1872–76)—twice as long as most students—yet he never advanced beyond first runner-up in any of the competitions that he entered, despite tackling several of Bach's most challenging pieces.

As someone who regularly taught the Mendelssohn sonatas (and who must also have played them), Franck was naturally influenced by these works in his own organ compositions. While this assertion has never before been made in either the Franck or Mendelssohn literature, it is quite incontestable in the case of Franck's Choral No. 3. Just consider how Franck prepares for (p.155) the beautiful Adagio section of this piece, first with a fermata-topped V7 chord and then, following a change of manual and registration, with a suspended treble pitch from that chord that begins the ornamental melody. The manner in which Mendelssohn introduces the Adagio section of the first movement of his second sonata is essentially the same in all respects. Furthermore, as Franck commences his melody line, he adopts the same basic contour as Mendelssohn (descending, stepwise motion) and, more tellingly, the same motivic pattern (four sixteenths followed by two eighth notes). Franck also borrows Mendelssohn's technique of immediately restating his opening phrase in a different key.

The slowly sustained and thickly textured arpeggiated seventh chords found throughout the first half of Franck's Choral, conversely, seem to be inspired by the third movement of Mendelssohn's first sonata. Similar material appears in certain works written by or attributed to Bach, most famously in mm. 2 and 10 of the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 565,4 but Franck's procedure, in the two such passages immediately before his Adagio, of chromatically altering the seventh chord exactly three-quarters of the way through has its precedent only in this movement by Mendelssohn. Moreover, Franck employs precisely the same texture: eight manual voices divided evenly between the two hands, with the lowest pitch duplicated in the middle of the pedalboard. Given the organ's ability to sustain pitches, the effect is both idiomatic and dramatic.

2. The Prelude and Fugue in C Major, BWV 566

This early Bach work is known by various titles (“Prelude and Fugue,” “Toccata and Fugue,” and simply “Toccata”) and is transmitted in two different keys (C major and E major). Franck and his pupils knew the piece, by virtue of its inclusion in volume 3 of the Peters edition of the complete Bach organ works, as a Prelude and Fugue in C Major. The work's popularity within the Franck circle, which is documented by approximately a dozen student performances, was surpassed only by the Fantasy and Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537.

According to Franck's progress reports, four different times (June 1874, January 1877, June 1879, and January 1880) his pupils played either the “first part” or “second part” of the fugue.5 In making this distinction, Franck was alluding to the fact that this work actually contains two fugues, both of which are found in the section of the work marked Fuga (mm. 34–229). They correspond to mm. 34–122 (Peters edition, pp. 64–67) and measures 134–229 (Peters edition, pp. 68–71). One wonders whether Franck understood the “second part” of the fugue to include only the second fugue proper and not the brief toccata-like interlude that precedes it on the same page, for the latter seems too perfunctory to have served as an ersatz prelude. Whatever the answer, most of the student performances involved only the fugue and not the prelude, in accordance with Franck's general reliance on Bach fugues as teaching repertory.

(p.156) 3. Franck's Own Compositions

During the 1873–74 academic year, Franck began to teach his own organ works, and he would continue to do so until his final semester. He taught the Six Pièces throughout his tenure; starting in 1885, he also taught the Trois Pièces ( the Fantasy in A Major, Cantabile, and Pièce héroïque), which were not published until 1883. The only one of these nine works not cited in the records is the Pièce héroïque, although we have it on good authority that Marie Prestat, one of Franck's favorite pupils, once brought this piece into class, much to her teacher's delight.6 Twenty-two performances of these eight works are documented. Thus Franck's own music was almost as popular within his organ studio as the Mendelssohn sonatas were.

The various ways in which Franck's compositions are cited in the conservatory records are not without interest or, for that matter, without error. For example, Franck designated Jean-Jacques Jemain's repertoire selection for the June 1887 exam as the commencement or “beginning” of the Grande Pièce symphonique. By this, Franck must have meant the material that precedes the much longer sonata-form section beginning in m. 60, which in performance presumably would have extended only to m. 57, thereby avoiding the weak and transitional second-inversion F-sharp-minor chord in mm. 58–59. The next documented performance of this piece is that by Georges-Paul Bondon at the 1889 competition (implying that a piece of this length could be played in its entirety only at one of these events, rather than on a semester exam; see also Henri Kaiser in 1884). According to the staff member who quite carelessly prepared the report, Bondon performed the Priere [sic] symphonique en fa # min. by none other than J. S. Bach (!).

In his report on Anatole-Léon Grand-Jany in June 1883, Franck wrote that the repertory selection was his Priere en si b. It is by no means clear from this inscription whether Franck is referring to his Prière, which is in C-sharp minor, or his only organ work in B-flat, the Final. Happily, the matter is resolved by a recently published letter of May 14, 1883, from Franck to his pupil Gabriel Pierné:

We speak of you often in class. It is going fairly well. I hope for a first prize for Grand-Jany. Kaiser works well; he could obtain a second prize. Jeannin does not progress much; for the moment he has been overtaken by Kaiser. … As for the new students, I cannot yet judge whether they will be ready to compete. … In next month's exam, Grand-Jany will play my piece in B-flat, [the one] with which you won your prize, and at the competition the Passacaglia of J. S. Bach.7

(p.157) The final paragraph of this excerpt shows conclusively—and this is corroborated by the data on Pierné's repertoire selection for the 1882 competition—that Grand-Jany played the Final, one of Franck's most virtuosic compositions for the organ. Significantly, it also reveals that Grand-Jany performed Bach's Passacaglia in C Minor at the competition in 1883, which is one of the nine years for which no official competition report has survived. Franck guessed correctly about his students’ chances at the upcoming competition: Grand-Jany took first prize, and Henri Kaiser second prize.8 There is no evidence that Paul-Joseph Jeannin, who placed higher at the 1882 competition than Kaiser (first runner-up versus second runner-up), or any other student took part. Jeannin was definitely allowed to compete in 1884 but continued his downward spiral by not even placing.

We also learn from this letter some interesting details, at least for the 1882–83 academic year, about Franck's timetable for selecting which pupils would enter the competitions. He probably never questioned that his two most advanced students would participate, but he was unsure of the beginners (which presumably included Édouard Rouher, Louis Landry, and Léon Honnoré, even though only Landry took the June exam). With only two months to go before the competition, these novices would have had relatively little time to learn a new piece, something that would have been expected of any competitor.9 There is no way of knowing how long Grand-Jany had been preparing the Passacaglia, which he was learning at the same time as Franck's Final.

Franck was certainly proud of both Grand-Jany and Kaiser, but one senses that he was prouder still of Pierné, his star pupil from the previous year. According to Franck's final progress report on him in June 1882 (see app. 2), Pierné was that rare blend of talent and diligence, and Franck may regularly have lauded him (“We speak of you often in class”) as a model student. Although Pierné was still a teenager at the time, Franck was already treating him less like a student than a colleague, as the disparaging remarks about poor Jeannin make all too clear.

4. Lemmens: “Petite Pièce”

The conservatory records document three student performances of music by the Belgian organist Jacques-Nicholas Lemmens, twice in January 1879 (Georges Marty and Lucien Hillemacher) and once in January 1885 (Jean-Jacques Jemain). In the first two instances, Franck cited the Lemmens work as “Petite Pièce,” while in the last he merely wrote “Pièce.” This is hardly enough information to identify the particular composition(s) played, especially considering the many organ works by Lemmens that could qualify as “petite pièces.” All the students involved were in their first semester of study, which (p.158) suggests that Franck was referring to the same trifling work, perhaps one taken from Lemmens's École d’orgue.

5. Handel: Concerto in B-Flat Major

One student performance of a work by George Frideric Handel is documented, that by Louis de Serres in June 1886 of a Concerto in B-flat Major. No fewer than five organ concertos in this key by Handel have survived, including two rather famous ones from his Opus 4. Most likely, de Serres played one of these two works. Whether he performed just the organ part, as opposed to a reduction of the entire score, is entirely conjectural. Franck himself, accompanied by an orchestra, played an F-major organ concerto by Handel on the first of his two concerts in Angers in December 1888.10 It was presumably one of the two very popular concertos in this key from Opus 4.

6. Schumann: Study in A-Flat Major, OP. 56, NO. 4

The data attest to two student performances (Hedwige Chrétien in January 1887 and Georges Aubry in July 1889) of this piece from Robert Schumann's Six Studies for Pedal Piano. Given Franck's tendency toward canon in his own compositions, it is hardly surprising that he would have been attracted to this collection, which in fact is a set of canonic studies. Ironically, though, the only material from this opus appropriated by Franck in one of his organ works has nothing to do with this technique. Rather, in the Quasi allegretto section of his Pastorale, Franck simulates the accompaniment, and not the actual canon, of the fifth of Schumann's Studies. As one can tell by comparing mm. 45–56 of Franck's work to mm. 1–15 of Schumann's, Franck follows his model with respect to virtually all the elements of music: mode (minor), tempo (moderately fast), dynamics (soft), articulation (staccato), rhythm (constant eighth-note motion), harmony (minor triads and minor seventh chords), texture (four-voice chords in the hands supported by occasional “pizzicato” pedal notes), and melody (the first five chords in each section or work produce the same stepwise pattern in the top voice, beginning with the fifth degree of the scale, descending to the fourth, rising back to the fifth and then to the sixth, and falling back to the fifth). And lest there be any doubt about the matter, Franck even begins, like Schumann, not with a root-position chord but, most unusually, with one in second inversion. (p.159) (p.160) (p.161) (p.162) (p.163) (p.164) (p.165) (p.166) (p.167) (p.168) (p.169) (p.170) (p.171) (p.172)

Works Played by César Franck's Organ Students, 1872–90

Exam or Competition

Student

Work Played

Exam of June 1872

Georges Deslandres

Fugue in G Minor (“Little”), BWV 578

Louis Benoit Bazile

Concerto in G Major after Prince Johann Ernst, BWV 592, first movement

Paul Wachs

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 3, first movement

Samuel Rousseau

Fugue in B Minor on a Theme by Corelli, BWV 579

Francis Thomé

minor-key fugue from vol. 3 of the Peters edition of Bach's organ works

Exam of January 1873

Louis Benoit Bazile

Fugue in G Minor (“Little”), BWV 578

Samuel Rousseau

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 546/2

Francis Thomé

Prelude and Fugue in C Major, BWV 566

Jean Tolbecque

Fugue in G Minor, BWV 542/2

Marie-Antoinette Gaillard

Fugue in F Minor from the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 857/2 or BWV 881/2

Georges Verschneider

Canzona in D Minor, BWV 588

Joseph-Paul Humblot

Fugue in E Minor, BWV 533/2

Adèle Billault

Prelude in E Minor, BWV 533/1

Exam of June 1873

Louis Benoit Bazile

Fugue in A Major, BWV 536/2

Samuel Rousseau

Prelude in C Minor, BWV 546/1

Francis Thomé

Fugue in D Minor, BWV 539/2

Jean Tolbecque

Concerto in A Minor after Vivaldi, BWV 593, first movement

Georges Verschneider

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 546/2

Joseph-Paul Humblot

Fantasy in C Minor, BWV 537/1

Adèle Billault

Toccata in D Minor (“Dorian”), BWV 538/1

Exam of January 1874

Samuel Rousseau

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Jean Tolbecque

Fugue in G Minor (“Little”), BWV 578

Georges Verschneider

Fugue in G Minor, BWV 542/2

Joseph-Paul Humblot

Fugue in C Major, BWV 566/2, presumably the first fugue in the movement (pp. 64–67 of vol. 3 of the Peters edition)

Adèle Billault

Concerto in A Minor after Vivaldi, BWV 593, first movement

Exam of June 1874

Samuel Rousseau

Fugue in G Minor, BWV 535/2

Jean Tolbecque

Fugue in D Major, BWV 532/2

Georges Verschneider

Franck: Fantasy in C Major; Bach: Trio Sonata No. 1, first movement

Joseph-Paul Humblot

Fugue in C Major, BWV 566/2, “second part” (pp. 68–71 of vol. 3 of the Peters edition)

Adèle Billault

Fantasy in G Minor, BWV 542/1

Amédée-Jean Dutacq

Fantasy in C Minor, BWV 537/1

Marie-Léonie Renaud

Canzona in D Minor, BWV 588

Vincent D’Indy

Fugue in G Minor (“Little”), BWV 578

Competition of July 1874

Samuel Rousseau

Fugue in C Major, BWV 566/2

Vincent D’Indy

Concerto in A Minor after Vivaldi, BWV 593

Joseph-Paul Humblot

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 546/2

Georges Verschneider

Prelude in B Minor, BWV 544/1

Exam of January 1875

Samuel Rousseau

Fugue in F Minor, BWV 534/2

Jean Tolbecque

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 1, first movement

Georges Verschneider

Fugue in B Minor, BWV 544/2

Adèle Billault

Franck: Prélude, Fugue et Variation

Marie-Léonie Renaud

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Vincent D’Indy

Fugue in C Minor on a Theme by Legrenzi, BWV 574

Exam of June 1875

Samuel Rousseau

Fugue in C Major, BWV 545/2

Jean Tolbecque

Prelude in D Major, BWV 532/1

Georges Verschneider

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 6

Adèle Billault

Fugue in G Minor, BWV 535/2

Marie-Léonie Renaud

Fugue in C Major, BWV 566/2

Vincent D’Indy

Concerto in A Minor after Vivaldi, BWV 593, last movement

Marie-Louise Genty

Fugue in B Minor on a Theme by Corelli, BWV 579

Camille Benoit

Fugue in G Minor (“Little”), BWV 578

Competition of July 1875

Marie-Louise Genty

Concerto in G Major after Prince Johann Ernst, BWV 592

Marie-Léonie Renaud

Fugue in C Major, BWV 566/2

Samuel Rousseau

Prelude in E-flat Major, BWV 552/1

Jean Tolbecque

Concerto in A Minor after Vivaldi, BWV 593

Vincent D’Indy

Passacaglia in C Minor, BWV 582

Georges Verschneider

Toccata in F Major, BWV 540/1

Exam of January 1876

Samuel Rousseau

Prelude in G Major, BWV 541/1

Jean Tolbecque

Fugue in A Minor, BWV 543/2

Georges Verschneider

Fantasy in G Minor, BWV 542/1

Marie-Léonie Renaud

Fugue in D Minor, BWV 539/2

Marie-Louise Genty

Fugue in G Minor (“Little”), BWV 578

Camille Benoit

“O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde gross,” BWV 622

Exam of June 1876

Jean Tolbecque

Toccata, Adagio, and Fugue in C Major, BWV 564, last two movements

Georges Verschneider

“O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig,” BWV 656

Marie-Léonie Renaud

Fugue in C Minor on a Theme by Legrenzi, BWV 574

Marie-Louise Genty

Fugue in F Minor, BWV 534/2

Camille Benoit

Prelude and Fugue in C Minor, BWV 549

Marie-Anna Papot

Fantasy in C Minor, BWV 537/1

Competition of July 1876

Marie-Louise Genty

Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 565

Marie-Léonie Renaud

Franck: Prélude, Fugue et Variation

Georges Verschneider

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 3

Samuel Rousseau

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Marie-Anna Papot

Fugue in B Minor on a Theme by Corelli, BWV 579

Camille Benoit

Concerto in A Minor after Vivaldi, BWV 593

Jean Tolbecque

Fugue in E Minor (“Wedge”), BWV 548/2

Exam of January 1877

Samuel Rousseau

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 1, first movement

Georges Verschneider

Franck: Pastorale

Marie-Léonie Renaud

Fugue in A Major, BWV 536/2

Marie-Anna Papot

Fugue in C Major, BWV 566/2, “second part”

Clément-Jules Broutin

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Exam of June 1877

Georges Verschneider

Franck: Prière

Marie-Léonie Renaud

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 546/2

Marie-Anna Papot

Fugue in F Major, BWV 540/2

Exam of January 1878

Marie-Anna Papot

Fugue in C Minor on a Theme by Legrenzi, BWV 574

Clément-Jules Broutin

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 6

Henri Dallier

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Exam of June 1878

Marie-Anna Papot

Fantasy in G Minor, BWV 542/1

Henri Dallier

Franck: Fantasy in C Major

Exam of January 1879

Marie-Anna Papot

Bach: Fugue in C Major, either BWV 545/2 or BWV 547/2

Auguste Chapuis

Pastorale in F Major, BWV 590

Jean Lapuchin

Fugue in E Minor, BWV 533/2

Georges Marty

Lemmens: “Petite Pièce”

Lucien Hillemacher

Lemmens: “Petite Pièce”

Exam of June 1879

Marie-Anna Papot

Fugue in A Major, BWV 536/2

Auguste Chapuis

Fugue in G Minor, BWV 535/2

Jean Lapuchin

Fugue in C Major, BWV 566/2, “second part”

Competition of July 1879

Auguste Chapuis

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 546/2

Marie-Anna Papot

Bach: Fugue in C Minor, either BWV 549/2 or BWV 574

Exam of January 1880

Marie-Anna Papot

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 2

Auguste Chapuis

Bach: Fugue in D Minor, either BWV 538/2 (“Dorian”) or BWV 539/2

Lucien Hillemacher

Fugue in C Major, BWV 566/2, “first part” ( pp. 64–67 of vol. 3 of the Peters edition)

“Rigaud”

Prelude and Fugue in G Major, BWV 541

Pierre Sourilas

Fugue in G Minor, BWV 535/2

Exam of June 1880

Marie-Anna Papot

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 2

Auguste Chapuis

Toccata in D Minor (“Dorian”), BWV 538/1

Pierre Sourilas

Toccata in F Major, BWV 540/1

Exam of January 1881

Auguste Chapuis

Prelude in E-flat Major, BWV 552/1

Pierre Sourilas

Toccata in D Minor (“Dorian”), BWV 538/1

Gabriel Pierné

Fantasy in C Minor, BWV 537/1

Louis Ganne

Bach: Fugue in E Major from the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 854/2 or BWV 878/2

Exam of June 1881

Auguste Chapuis

Fugue in E-flat Major, BWV 552/2

Pierre Sourilas

Fugue in D Minor, BWV 539/2

Gabriel Pierné

Fugue in G Minor (“Little”), BWV 578

Louis Ganne

Prelude and Fugue in E Minor, BWV 533

Competition of July 1881

Gabriel Pierné

Concerto in A Minor after Vivaldi, BWV 593, last movement

Pierre Sourilas

Fugue in A Minor, BWV 543/2

Auguste Chapuis

Fantasy in C Minor, BWV 537/1, or Fantasy in G Minor, BWV 542/1

Exam of January 1882

Gabriel Pierné

Franck: Fantasy in C Major

Louis Ganne

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Paul-Joseph Jeannin

Prelude and Fugue in E Minor, BWV 533

Henri Kaiser

Canzona in D Minor, BWV 588

Anatole-Léon Grand-Jany

Bach: Fugue in D-sharp Minor from the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 853/2 or BWV 877/2

Frédéric Duplessis

Bach: Fugue in E-flat Major from the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 852/2 or BWV 876/2

Exam of June 1882

Louis Ganne

Fugue in D Minor, BWV 539/2

Paul-Joseph Jeannin

Fugue in G Minor, BWV 535/2

Henri Kaiser

Fugue in G Major, BWV 550/2

Anatole-Léon Grand-Jany

Fantasy in C Minor, BWV 537/1

Competition of July 1882

Louis Ganne

Fugue in F Major, BWV 540/2

Paul-Joseph Jeannin

Bach: Fugue in C Major, either BWV 564/3 or BWV 566/2

Anatole-Léon Grand-Jany

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Gabriel Pierné

Franck: Final

Henri Kaiser

Bach: Fugue in C Minor, either BWV 549/2 or BWV 574

Exam of January 1883

Paul-Joseph Jeannin

Fugue in C Major, BWV 545/2

Henri Kaiser

Prelude in A Minor, BWV 543/1

Anatole-Léon Grand-Jany

Fugue in D Minor, BWV 539/2

Édouard Rouher

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 6, excerpts

Louis Landry

Prelude and Fugue in G Major, BWV 557 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Léon Honnoré

Fugue in E Minor, BWV 555/2 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Exam of June 1883

Paul-Joseph Jeannin

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Henri Kaiser

Prelude in C Minor, BWV 546/1

Anatole-Léon Grand-Jany

Franck: Final

Louis Landry

Concerto in G Major after Prince Johann Ernst, BWV 592

Exam of January 1884

Paul-Joseph Jeannin

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 2

Henri Kaiser

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 4, second and third movements

Édouard Rouher

“O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde gross,” BWV 622

Louis Landry

Concerto in A Minor after Vivaldi, BWV 593

Léonie Guintrange

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 1, third movement

Carlos Mesquita

Canzona in D Minor, BWV 588

Exam of June 1884

Paul-Joseph Jeannin

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 3

Édouard Rouher

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 2, last movement

Louis Landry

Fugue in D Minor, BWV 539/2

Carlos Mesquita

Fugue in G Minor (“Little”), BWV 578

Léonie Guintrange

Prelude in C Minor, BWV 546/1

Competition of July 1884

Carlos Mesquita

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 1

Paul-Joseph Jeannin

unspecified Fugue in C Minor by Bach

Henri Kaiser

Franck: Grande Pièce symphonique

Louis Landry

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 6

Exam of January 1885

Louis Landry

Concerto in A Minor after Vivaldi, BWV 593, last movement

Carlos Mesquita

Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 565

Léonie Guintrange

“O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde gross,” BWV 622

Henri Pinot

Fugue in G Minor, BWV 542/2

Jean-Jacques Jemain

Lemmens: “Pièce”

Exam of June 1885

Louis Landry

Prelude and Fugue in A Minor, BWV 543

Carlos Mesquita

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 6

Henri Pinot

Franck: Fantasy in A Major

Jean-Jacques Jemain

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Exam of January 1886

Louis Landry

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 1

Carlos Mesquita

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 4, third movement

Adolphe Marty

Fugue in A Minor, BWV 543/2

Georges-Paul Bondon

Fugue in E Major from Book 2 of the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 878/2

Louis de Serres

Fugue in G Minor (“Little”), BWV 578

Dynam-Victor Fumet

Fugue in E Minor, BWV 533/2

Alfred Bachelet

Fugue in F Minor from Book 1 of the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 857/2

Georges Aubry

Fugue in B-flat Minor from Book 1 of the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 867/2

Cesarino Galeotti

Prelude and Fugue in G Minor, BWV 558 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Louis-André Frémaux

Prelude and Fugue in A Major from Book 2 of the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 888

Henri Letocart

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Aimé Féry

Fugue in D Major from Book 2 of the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 874/2

Exam of June 1886

Louis Landry

Fugue in B Minor on a Theme by Corelli, BWV 579

Jean-Jacques Jemain

“O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig,” BWV 656

Adolphe Marty

Fugue in D Major, BWV 532/2; Franck: Fantasy in C Major

Georges-Paul Bondon

Prelude and Fugue in E Minor, BWV 555 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Louis de Serres

Handel: Concerto in B-flat Major

Dynam-Victor Fumet

Fugue in G Minor, BWV 535/2

Georges Aubry

Fugue in C-sharp Minor from Book 1 of the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 849/2

Louis-André Frémaux

Fugue in B-flat Minor from Book 2 of the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 891/2

Aimé Féry

Fugue in C Minor from Book 2 of the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 871/2

Exam of January 1887

Jean-Jacques Jemain

Franck: Cantabile

Georges-Paul Bondon

Concerto in G Major after Prince Johann Ernst, BWV 592

Louis de Serres

Prelude in A Minor, BWV 543/1

Dynam-Victor Fumet

Mendelssohn: Fugue in C Minor from Three Preludes and Fugues for the Organ, op. 37

Alfred Bachelet

Prelude and Fugue in E Minor, BWV 555 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Georges Aubry

Fugue in G Minor, BWV 131a

Cesarino Galeotti

Prelude and Fugue in B-flat Major, BWV 560 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Louis-André Frémaux

Prelude and Fugue in E Minor, BWV 533

Aimé Féry

Fugue in D-sharp Minor from Book 2 of the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 877/2

Henri Letocart

Fantasy in G Minor, BWV 542/1

“Fournier”

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 6

Hedwige Chrétien

Schumann: Study in A-flat Major, op. 56, no. 4

Paul-Albert Pillard

Fugue in B-flat Minor from Book 1 of the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 867/2

Exam of June 1887

Jean-Jacques Jemain

Franck: “beginning of” the Grande Pièce symphonique (presumably mm. 1-57)

Georges-Paul Bondon

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Georges Aubry

Concerto in A Minor after Vivaldi, BWV 593

Cesarino Galeotti

Toccata in D Minor, BWV 565/1

Louis-André Frémaux

Fantasy in C Minor, BWV 537/1

Aimé Féry

Fugue in A-flat Major from the Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 862/2 or BWV 886/2

Henri Letocart

Prelude in B Minor, BWV 544/1

Hedwige Chrétien

Prelude in A Minor, BWV 543/1

Paul-Albert Pillard

Prelude and Fugue in G Major, BWV 557 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Exam of January 1888

Jean-Jacques Jemain

Fugue in E Minor (“Wedge”), BWV 548/2

Georges Aubry

Toccata in D Minor (“Dorian”), BWV 538/1

Georges-Paul Bondon

Fugue in F Major, BWV 540/2

Paul-Albert Pillard

Fugue in E Minor, BWV 555/2 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Marie Prestat

Prelude and Fugue in C Major, BWV 566

Joséphine Boulay

Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 565

Jean-Ferdinand Schneider

Prelude and Fugue in B-flat Major, BWV 560 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Bruno-Marius Maurel

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 2

Édouard Bopp

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 5

Exam of June 1888

Georges-Paul Bondon

Prelude and Fugue in C Minor, BWV 546

Georges Aubry

Franck: Cantabile

Marie Prestat

Toccata in D Minor, BWV 565/1

Joséphine Boulay

Fugue in C Minor on a Theme by Legrenzi, BWV 574

Jean-Ferdinand Schneider

Prelude and Fugue in E Minor, BWV 533

Bruno-Marius Maurel

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 5, second movement

Édouard Bopp

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 4, first movement

Competition of July 1888

Georges-Paul Bondon

Franck: Prière

Joséphine Boulay

Fugue in E Minor (“Wedge”), BWV 548/2

Marie Prestat

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 4

Georges Aubry

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 546/2

Exam of January 1889

Georges-Paul Bondon

“O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig,” BWV 656

Georges Aubry

Bach: Prelude in A Minor, presumably BWV 543/1

Henri Letocart

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 3

Marie Prestat

Toccata in F Major, BWV 540/1

Bruno-Marius Maurel

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 5, first movement

Albert Mahaut

Fugue in D Major, BWV 532/2

Paul Ternisien

Prelude and Fugue in G Minor, BWV 558 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Achille Runner

Prelude and Fugue in E Minor, BWV 555 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Exam of June 1889

Georges-Paul Bondon

Prelude in B Minor, BWV 544/1

Georges Aubry

Fugue in B Minor, BWV 544/2

Henri Letocart

presumably Mendelssohn's Sonata No. 2, first movement

Marie Prestat

Fugue in A Minor, BWV 543/2

Albert Mahaut

Franck: Prière

Paul Ternisien

Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537/2

Achille Runner

Fantasy in C Minor, BWV 537/1

Competition of July 1889

Marie Prestat

Franck: Prélude, Fugue et Variation

Albert Mahaut

Fantasy and Fugue in G Minor, BWV 542

Georges Aubry

Schumann: Study in A-flat Major, op. 56, no. 4

Georges-Paul Bondon

Franck: Grande Pièce symphonique

Henri Letocart

Prelude in E-flat Major, BWV 552/1

Exam of January 1890

Henri Letocart

Prelude in G Major, BWV 541/1

Marie Prestat

Franck: Fantasy in A Major

Paul Ternisien

Prelude and Fugue in C Major, BWV 566

Achille Runner

Toccata, Adagio, and Fugue in C Major, BWV 564, first movement

Henri Libert

Prelude in G Major, BWV 568; Fugue in G Minor, BWV 131a

Jules Bouval

Prelude and Fugue in E Minor, BWV 555 (Eight Little Preludes and Fugues)

Henri Busser

Fugue in C Minor on a Theme by Legrenzi, BWV 574

Georges Guiraud

Toccata, Adagio, and Fugue in C Major, BWV 564, last movement

Charles Tournemire

Concerto in A Minor after Vivaldi, BWV 593

Exam of June 1890

Henri Letocart

Passacaglia in C Minor, BWV 582

Marie Prestat

Passacaglia in C Minor, BWV 582, concluding fugue

Paul Ternisien

Fantasy in C Minor, BWV 562/1

Achille Runner

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 4

Henri Libert

Concerto in C Major after Prince Johann Ernst, BWV 595

Henri Busser

Aria in F Major, BWV 587

Charles Tournemire

Fugue in G Minor, BWV 542/2

Competition of July 1890

Henri Letocart

Franck: Pastorale

Marie Prestat

Franck: Prière

Charles Tournemire

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 6

Henri Libert

Bach: Prelude and Fugue in A Minor, presumably BWV 543

Achille Runner

Bach: Prelude and Fugue in C Minor, presumably BWV 546

Notes:

(1.) For biographical information on these individuals, see Pierre 1900, 690–869; and Davies 1970, 320–21. See also Fauquet 1999a, 959–64; and Ochse 1994, 231–32.

(2.) Smith 2002, 185.

(3.) Hinton, 7.

(4.) See also m. 106 of the Fugue in C Minor on a Theme by Legrenzi, BWV 574, and m. 103 of “O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig,” BWV 656.

(5.) For example, in his progress report on Joseph-Paul Humblot in June 1874, Franck designated the excerpt played as the 2e Partie de la fugue en ut. Livre 3, No 7. The book and number refer to the work's position in the Peters edition of Bach's complete organ works.

(6.) Smith 1999, 46 n. 14; and Smith 2002, 185.

(7.) “Nous parlons souvent de vous à la classe. Elle marche assez bien, j’espère un 1er prix pour Grand-Jany. Kaiser travaille bien il pourrait obtenir un 2d prix Jeannin n’avance pas beaucoup; pour le moment il est dépassé par Kaiser. Quant aux nouveaux je ne puis pas encore juger s’ils seront en état de concourir. A l’examen du mois prochain Grand-Jany jouera ma pièce en si b avec laquelle vous avez gagné votre prix et au concours la passacaille de J. S. Bach.” See Fauquet 1999b, 137–38.

(8.) On these prizes, see Fauquet 1999a, 962; and Ochse 1994, 231–32.

(9.) Only in the case of Marie-Léonie Renaud and Jean Tolbecque in 1875, and of Samuel Rousseau in 1876, do we see that a student played the same work for both the June exam and the competition.

(10.) Fauquet 1999a, 654.