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Stubborn RootsRace, Culture, and Inequality in U.S. and South African Schools$
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Prudence L. Carter

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199899630

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199899630.001.0001

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Distinctions and Convergences

Distinctions and Convergences

A Brief History of Race and Education in the United States and South Africa

Chapter:
(p.17) 1 Distinctions and Convergences
Source:
Stubborn Roots
Author(s):

Prudence L. Carter

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199899630.003.0002

This chapter offers a brief social history of the development of racial inequality, as well as an overview of how school desegregation emerged in the United States and South Africa. It argues that both of these sharply unequal societies have committed to some ideal of integrated education as a means either to societal transformation or to the social advancement of groups historically excluded because of racial separatism. The United States continues to face the challenge of equalizing educational outcomes more than fifty years after the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision. Similarly, South Africa, a relatively new democracy, faces the challenges of schooling diverse groups of students nearly two decades after apartheid's demise. This chapter highlights cross-national similarities and differences in educational policies and practices regarding school desegregation or mixed race schooling.

Keywords:   cross-national study, desegregation, U.S. history, racial inequality, schools, South African history

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