Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Parent AppUnderstanding Families in the Digital Age$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Lynn Schofield Clark

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199899616

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199899616.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 November 2017

Identity 2.0

Identity 2.0

Young People and Digital and Mobile Media

Chapter:
(p.75) Chapter 4 Identity 2.0
Source:
The Parent App
Author(s):

Lynn Schofield Clark

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199899616.003.0004

In this chapter, we learn more about how young people experience parental approaches to digital and mobile media. As they get older, young people increasingly desire respect and connection from their peers, and they seek these through self-expression that's enabled with digital and mobile media. Young people need to learn how much to reveal about themselves online in order to seem accessible, and how much to withhold so as not to come across as needy and insecure. They need to figure out how to reveal something of themselves so that others they care about will recognize and acknowledge them, while also discovering how much to rely on popular culture to define themselves; and, finally, they need to figure out how to present themselves as engaged in certain pursuits, like gaming or academics, without alienating themselves from peer cultures that do not offer support for such practices.

Keywords:   Kaiser family foundation study, identity-construction, mythic, Neopets, Facebook, interpretive reproduction, Erving Goffman, impression management, Sherry Turkle, individualism, narcissism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .