Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Faith and the Founders of the American Republic$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Mark David Hall and Daniel L. Dreisbach

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199843336

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199843336.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 October 2018

The Quaker Contributions of John Dickinson to the Creation of the American Republic

The Quaker Contributions of John Dickinson to the Creation of the American Republic

Chapter:
(p.277) 12 The Quaker Contributions of John Dickinson to the Creation of the American Republic
Source:
Faith and the Founders of the American Republic
Author(s):

Jane E Calvert

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199843336.003.0013

Few men worked harder to establish the American Republic than John Dickinson. He was the only major political figure active in America from the earliest days of the contest with Britain through the early republic. He probably held more public posts than any other, in the Stamp Act Congress, both Continental Congresses, the Pennsylvania and Delaware militias, as president of Delaware and Pennsylvania, president of the Annapolis Convention, member of the Constitutional Convention, and president of the Delaware constitutional convention. He was the most prolific founder, writing pamphlets, newspaper articles, military regulations, bills, proclamations, petitions, constitutions, and more, including America’s first patriotic song. With his eloquent assertions of American rights and liberties, he became the country’s first political hero and was seen abroad as spokesman for the American cause. Although he never joined a Quaker meeting, his contributions to creation of the American republic were informed by the Friends’ tradition.

Keywords:   John Dickinson, Quaker, constitutions

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .