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Downwardly MobileThe Changing Fortunes of American Realism$
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Andrew Lawson

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199828050

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199828050.001.0001

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Hamlin Garland's Vertical Vision

Hamlin Garland's Vertical Vision

Chapter:
(p.112) 6 Hamlin Garland's Vertical Vision
Source:
Downwardly Mobile
Author(s):

Andrew Lawson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199828050.003.0006

This chapter examines Hamlin Garland’s contradictory class identity, showing how his residual attachment to the small farmers of his Iowa and North Dakota childhood was matched by an identification with the cultural values and economic aspirations of the Boston elite. It explores Garland’s ambivalent stance towards Populism, whose collectivist politics were finally inimical to the ideology of individualism he found represented by the single-tax policy of Henry George, and the impressionist aesthetic he developed in his story collection, Main-Travelled Roads (1891). The chapter shows how Garland’s stories dramatize an irreducible internal conflict between communal solidarities and individual self-expression.

Keywords:   populism, collective action, individualism, iowa, boston

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