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Comparative Law as Transnational LawA Decade of the German Law Journal$
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Russel A. Miller and Peer C. Zumbansen

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199795208

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199795208.001.0001

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The Day the Earth Stood Still?—Reading Jürgen Habermas’s Essay “February 15” Against Ian McEwan’s Novel Saturday †

The Day the Earth Stood Still?—Reading Jürgen Habermas’s Essay “February 15” Against Ian McEwan’s Novel Saturday †

Chapter:
(p.433) 32 The Day the Earth Stood Still?—Reading Jürgen Habermas’s Essay “February 15” Against Ian McEwan’s Novel Saturday
Source:
Comparative Law as Transnational Law
Author(s):

Russell A. Miller

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199795208.003.0048

The third essay in Habermas's collection The Divided West is entitled “February 15, or: What Binds Europeans.” The essay regionalizes the global claims Habermas makes in the longer chapter “Does the Constitutionalization of International Law Still Have a Chance?” That is, in “February 15,” Habermas makes the case for a European postnational order that he hopes will become the vanguard for the emergence of universal cosmopolitanism. Habermas concludes that all that is lacking for the achievement of this beachhead from which Europe can, in its turn, champion a “community of free and equal citizens” in a “global public sphere,” is a “European identity.” This chapter calls into question Habermas's conclusions about a European identity. It argues, by reference to Ian McEwan's novel Saturday, that Habermas overlooked the rich, persistent diversity that is the true wonder of Europe.

Keywords:   Habermas, essay, European postnational order, universal cosmopolitanism, European identity

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