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The Ambivalent PartisanHow Critical Loyalty Promotes Democracy$

Howard G. Lavine, Christopher D. Johnston, and Marco R. Steenbergen

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199772759

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199772759.001.0001

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Source:
The Ambivalent Partisan
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