Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
CosmopolisImagining Community in Late Classical Athens and the Early Roman Empire$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Daniel S. Richter

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199772681

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199772681.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 28 June 2017

“A Pure World of Signs”: Language and Empire

“A Pure World of Signs”: Language and Empire

Chapter:
(p.135) 4 “A Pure World of Signs”: Language and Empire
Source:
Cosmopolis
Author(s):

Daniel S. Richter (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199772681.003.0004

This chapter examines how early imperial intellectuals thought about Atticism and how the early imperial elite used language and in particular literary Atticism to create a model of the unity of the oikoumenê—in other words, how the language defined its space. It begins with a few representative sketches of Atticism in action, moments at which the rules of the game are broken or the boundaries crossed. The chapter then turns to an extended discussion of Lucian of Samosata’s writing about writing as a way of exploring how an early imperial “outsider” intellectual used language as a mark of his insider status. Finally, the last section of the chapter looks at how certain post-classical authors thought about culture and acculturation as a process and takes as its subject a series of post-classical re-imaginings of stories surrounding the Scythian sage Anacharsis, the model of the Hellenized barbarian who, at least according to Herodotus, was defined by his failure to be both Greek and barbarian.

Keywords:   Bourdieu, linguistic capital, Atticism, Koinê, Lucian of Samosata, Favorinus of Arelate, Anacharsis

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .