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Trouble in the WestEgypt and the Persian Empire, 525-332 BC$
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Stephen Ruzicka

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199766628

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199766628.001.0001

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Preparing the Second Campaign: Engaging Greeks, 380–373

Preparing the Second Campaign: Engaging Greeks, 380–373

Chapter:
(p.99) chapter 10 Preparing the Second Campaign: Engaging Greeks, 380–373
Source:
Trouble in the West
Author(s):

Stephen Ruzicka

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199766628.003.0011

Since the Persian expeditionary army's withdrawal from Egypt in 388/7, Egyptian kings—Acoris and then Nectanebo—had been attending to Egyptian defenses, constructing fortified camps on the eastern and western frontiers, fortifying entries to the various Nile branches, and even adding fortification walls to many temples. They also hired Greek mercenaries in great numbers. Persians secured the middle territory with a Greek force under Athenian condottiere Iphicrates as early as 379, and subsequently Iphicrates directed Persian preparations, doing so thoroughly with simulated attacks and battles. A second Persian campaign, ready to launch by 373, seemed certain to succeed.

Keywords:   Pharnabazus, Iphicrates, Polyaenus, Phoenicia, Acco, Greek mercenaries

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