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Lawyers on TrialUnderstanding Ethical Misconduct$
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Richard L. Abel

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199760374

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199760374.001.0001

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Reaching for the Brass Ring

Reaching for the Brass Ring

Chapter:
(p.269) 5. Reaching for the Brass Ring
Source:
Lawyers on Trial
Author(s):

Richard L. Abel (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199760374.003.0005

This chapter presents a case involving Ernest Lee Brazil. It shows that Brazil chafed at all authority and restraint. He repeatedly left positions because he insisted on complete independence, refusing to answer to anyone, taking credit for every achievement. He used his position at Fox and Carskadon to write a novel and practice law privately. He left Bray when he was passed over for general counsel. He took unauthorized advances and salary increases at Federal Pacific Corp. He founded InterBank Mortgage Corporation because he “wanted to run the company without any day-to-day input from other executives”. He consulted no one about his loans. He misappropriated a subordinate's signature and notary seal. Brazil's original sin was hubris and his conviction that his superior talents and almost superhuman efforts entitled him to use every available means to grab the brass ring.

Keywords:   lawyers, misrepresentation, Ernest Lee Brazil, Federal Pacific Corp, Fox and Carskadon

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