Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
No Sure VictoryMeasuring U.S. Army Effectiveness and Progress in the Vietnam War$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Gregory A. Daddis

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199746873

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199746873.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 11 December 2018

Soldiers’ Interlude: The Symptoms of Withdrawal

Soldiers’ Interlude: The Symptoms of Withdrawal

Chapter:
(p.181) 8 Soldiers’ Interlude: The Symptoms of Withdrawal
Source:
No Sure Victory
Author(s):

Gregory A. Daddis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199746873.003.0008

Chapter 8 concentrates on how MACV assessed the organizational effectiveness of U.S. Army units serving in Vietnam in 1970. Did officers sense there had been a deterioration of combat effectiveness over time? Much of the Vietnam War historiography comments on the supposed deterioration of troop performance due to drug use, racial tension, and a breakdown in discipline. This chapter investigates how MACV measured such performance. It further asks if it was even feasible for the U.S. Army to withdraw from Vietnam while simultaneously maintaining its overall combat effectiveness.

Keywords:   organizational effectiveness, army discipline, drug use, racial tension, combat effectiveness

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .