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No Sure VictoryMeasuring U.S. Army Effectiveness and Progress in the Vietnam War$
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Gregory A. Daddis

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199746873

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199746873.001.0001

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Of Questions Not Asked: Measuring Effectiveness in the Counterinsurgency Era

Of Questions Not Asked: Measuring Effectiveness in the Counterinsurgency Era

Chapter:
(p.19) 1 Of Questions Not Asked: Measuring Effectiveness in the Counterinsurgency Era
Source:
No Sure Victory
Author(s):

Gregory A. Daddis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199746873.003.0001

This opening chapter, covering 1955–1965, provides an overview of contemporary counterinsurgency theory and analyzes the army’s counterinsurgency doctrine. It also illustrates the increasing influence of statistical analysis in the Department of Defense after Robert S. McNamara’s assumption of duties as the Secretary of Defense. The U.S. Army officer entering combat in 1965 seemingly could draw upon a wealth of counterinsurgency information—unless he was looking for how to measure progress and effectiveness. In the absence of doctrinal suggestions on how to develop metrics of progress and effectiveness, MACV, under pressure from McNamara, turned to computers and statistical analysis to help solve their measurement problems.

Keywords:   counterinsurgency theory, army doctrine, McNamara, statistical analysis, military effectiveness

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