Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Why Does College Cost So Much?$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Robert B. Archibald and David H. Feldman

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199744503

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199744503.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 November 2018

Higher Education Is a Service

Higher Education Is a Service

Chapter:
(p.35) 3 Higher Education Is a Service
Source:
Why Does College Cost So Much?
Author(s):

Robert B. Archibald

David H. Feldman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199744503.003.0003

The path that most service prices follow over time differs systematically from the evolution of goods prices over time. As far back as David Ricardo's work in the early 19th century, economists have known that slow labor productivity growth in services compared to goods could provide an explanation. In the 1960s, the work of William Baumol and William Bowen on prices in the performing arts explained this process and gave it the name it typically goes by—cost disease. This chapter explains cost disease and how it affects colleges and universities. The chapter then uses cost disease to make sense of the price data for the wide variety of industries presented in the previous chapter.

Keywords:   William Baumol, William Bowen, cost disease, productivity growth, David Ricardo

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .