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King of RagtimeScott Joplin and His Era$
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Edward A. Berlin

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199740321

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199740321.001.0001

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The Ragtime Dance, 1902

The Ragtime Dance, 1902

Chapter:
(p.129) Chapter 9 The Ragtime Dance, 1902
Source:
King of Ragtime
Author(s):

Edward A. Berlin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199740321.003.0009

A later version of the stage work that Joplin had performed in 1899 and 1900 finally reached print in the spring of 1902. At the insistence of his daughter Eleanor, John Stark published it under the title The Ragtime Dance. The work depicts an African American ball with a variety of ragtime dance steps and styles. The concept had several precedents, dating back at least to 1894, but the work closest to Joplin’s is Sidney Perrin’s Jennie Cooler Dance (1898), though Joplin’s music and lyric are clearly superior. Among Joplin’s six other publications that year was The Strenuous Life, a work notable for its tribute (implied by the title) to President Theodore Roosevelt for his courtesy to Booker T. Washington in inviting him for dinner in the White House in October 1901.

Keywords:   The Ragtime Dance, Sidney Perrin, The Strenuous Life, Theodore Roosevelt, Booker T. Washington

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