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Ideology, Psychology, and Law
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Ideology, Psychology, and Law

Jon Hanson and John Jost

Abstract

Formally, the law purports to be based solely in reasoned analysis, devoid of ideological bias or unconscious influences. Judges claim to act as umpires applying the rules, not making them. They frame their decisions as straightforward applications of an established set of legal doctrines, principles, and mandates to a given set of facts. As scholars who carefully study the law understand, that frame is a façade, and the impression that the legal system projects is an illusion. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. made a similar claim more than a century ago when he wrote that “the felt necessities of t ... More

Keywords: psychology, ideology, law, bias, influences, policy outcomes

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2012 Print ISBN-13: 9780199737512
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199737512.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Jon Hanson, editor

John Jost, contributor
New York University

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Contents

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I Introduction

II Correlates and Causes of Ideology

Chapter 4 Interpersonal Foundations of Ideological Thinking

Curtis D. Hardin, Rick M. Cheung, Michael W. Magee, Steven Noel, and Kasumi Yoshimura

Legal Comment

Anne L. Alstott

Legal Comment

Douglas A. Kysar

Chapter 7 Automatic Associations: Personal Attitudes or Cultural Knowledge?

Eric Luis Uhlmann, T. Andrew Poehlman, and Brian A. Nosek

Legal Comment

Jerry Kang

Chapter 8 The Policy IAT

Jon Hanson, and Mark Yeboah

III Protection and Preservation of Ideology

Chapter 10 Preference, Principle, and Political Casuistry

Eric D. Knowles, and Peter H. Ditto

Legal Comment

Martha Chamallas

Chapter 12 Bias Perception and the Spiral of Conflict

Kathleen A. Kennedy, and Emily Pronin

Legal Comment

Robert C. Bordone

IV Ideology in Legal Theory and Law

Chapter 15 The Mystique of Instrumentalism

Tom Tyler, and Lindsay Rankin

Legal Comment

James L. Cavallaro

Chapter 20 Ideology and the Study of Judicial Behavior

Lee Epstein, Andrew D. Martin, Kevin M. Quinn, and Jeffrey A. Segal

Chapter 21 Depoliticizing Administrative Law

Cass R. Sunstein, and Thomas J. Miles

End Matter