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Psychotherapy Relationships That WorkEvidence-Based Responsiveness$
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John C. Norcross

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199737208

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199737208.001.0001

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Culture

Culture

Chapter:
(p.316) Chapter 16 Culture
Source:
Psychotherapy Relationships That Work
Author(s):

Timothy B. Smith

Melanie M. Domenech Rodríguez

Guillermo Bernal

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199737208.003.0016

This chapter summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients’ cultural backgrounds. This chapter begins by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 patients. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele than traditional treatments. The most effective treatments tended to be those with greater numbers of cultural adaptations. Mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those provided to clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. This chapter recommends a series of research-supported therapeutic practices that account for clients’ culture, with culture-specific treatments being more effective than generally culture-sensitive treatments.

Keywords:   psychotherapy outcomes, ethnic minority groups, culture, meta-analysis, evidence-based practice, treatment adaptation

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