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Seeing Complexity in Public EducationProblems, Possibilities, and Success for All$
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Donald Peurach

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199736539

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199736539.001.0001

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Scaling Up

Scaling Up

Chapter:
(p.95) 3 Scaling Up
Source:
Seeing Complexity in Public Education
Author(s):

Donald J. Peurach

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199736539.003.0017

This chapter examines SFAF’s work scaling up the installed base of schools and its own organization. This was work performed concurrent with designing and supporting, and in interaction with increasing policy support. Extending the pattern introduced in Chapter 1, the chapter details how interactions among newly-adopting schools, the program, SFAF as an organization, and U.S. policy environments supported the rapid scale up of the Success for All network, from 1 to 1600 schools in twelve years. At the same time, the chapter details how these same dynamics drove widespread interpretation of Success for All as either a bureaucratic or a technocratic intervention (and not a resource for professional practice and learning). Rather than supporting expert, adaptive use, a consequence of these interpretations was that an estimated 75% of SFAF’s 1600 schools were locked into novice use and into rote, mechanical implementation, with the root cause being SFAF’s own training organization.

Keywords:   scale up, education policy, bureaucratic interpretation, technocratic interpretation, novice use, expert use, adaptive use, rote implementation, mechanical implementation, training organization

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