Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The American Catholic RevolutionHow the Sixties Changed the Church Forever$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Mark S. Massa, SJ

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199734122

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199734122.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 July 2018

Frederick McManus and Worship in the United States

Frederick McManus and Worship in the United States

Chapter:
(p.15) 2 Frederick McManus and Worship in the United States
Source:
The American Catholic Revolution
Author(s):

Mark S. Massa (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199734122.003.0002

This chapter argues that the most far-reaching of Vatican II’s reforms was not its redefinition of the Church as the “People of God” (the standard interpretive line among historians) but its reforms of how the Mass and sacraments would be celebrated (in English, not Latin; with the priest facing the people and not the wall, etc.). The chapter argues that it was this particular reception of Vatican II—that touching on Catholic worship—which shaped the post-Vatican battles within the Church. The chapter examines the career of the most important American interpreter of Vatican II’s reforms of the liturgy, Frederick McManus, who was the dean of the canon law school of the Catholic University of America and (more important) editor of the worship column (“Responses”) in the premier Catholic liturgical journal, Worship.

Keywords:   Frederick McManus, worship, Catholic mass, Vatican II, reception of Vatican II

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .