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Workers Across the AmericasThe Transnational Turn in Labor History$
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Leon Fink

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199731633

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199731633.001.0001

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Another World History Is Possible

Another World History Is Possible

Reflections on the Translocal, Transnational, and Global

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 Another World History Is Possible
Source:
Workers Across the Americas
Author(s):

John D. French

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199731633.003.0001

This chapter examines the wider interdisciplinary debate that followed the “death of another world” in 1989–91, which led to an era of globalization that challenged entrenched intellectual, political, and even geographical understandings of the world. It discusses why historians were latecomers to this booming arena while clarifying the conceptual difficulties facing those who would write a truly international or global history self-consciously situated outside strictly national narratives. In addressing linkages and connections across boundaries, it argues that the best avenue to create “another world history” is through a transnational approach that must, however, be combined with the concept of the translocal. In doing so, we enhance our ability to link effectively subnational specificities with supranational processes, extranational connections, and international institutions.

Keywords:   globalization, translocal, supranational processes, extranational connections

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