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The Seven Pillars of CreationThe Bible, Science, and the Ecology of Wonder$
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William P. Brown

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199730797

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199730797.001.0001

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Behemoth and the Beagle

Behemoth and the Beagle

Creation According to Job 38–41

Chapter:
(p.115) 5 Behemoth and the Beagle
Source:
The Seven Pillars of Creation
Author(s):

William P. Brown (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199730797.003.0005

God’s answer to Job is the focus of this chapter. God presents a panoramic sweep of creation that comprises the cosmic, the meteorological, and the biological. Its primary focus, however, is on the diversity and vitality of animal life in the wilderness. What was considered marginal from Job’s perspective now takes center stage in God’s answer, which reflects God’s biophilia. While de-centered, Job is shown to be integrally related to the wild. He was made by God “with” Behemoth, suggesting Job is linked with all creatures, including monstrous Leviathan. Biology, too, discerns a link that connects all life on Earth, a genetic link (DNA). God’s answer, moreover, takes Job on a grand tour of taxonomy, not unlike Charles Darwin’s around-the-world voyage on the H.M.S. Beagle early in his career. Read in the light of evolution, Job presents a powerful testimony to biodiversity and affirms the intrinsic value of all life.

Keywords:   biodiversity, biophilia, Darwin, Job, Behemoth, Leviathan, wilderness, wild, evolution, DNA

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