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The Epistemology of DisagreementNew Essays$
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David Christensen and Jennifer Lackey

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199698370

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199698370.001.0001

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Disagreement Without Transparency

Disagreement Without Transparency

Some Bleak Thoughts1

Chapter:
(p.9) 1 Disagreement Without Transparency
Source:
The Epistemology of Disagreement
Author(s):

John Hawthorne

Amia Srinivasan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199698370.003.0002

What ought one to do, epistemically speaking, when one encounters a disagreement? John Hawthorne and Amia Srinivasan argue that the search for satisfying and stable answers to this question will not be rewarded. This is because of the fact of non-transparency: that there are no conditions (including mental state conditions) such that we are always in a position to know whether they obtain. Non-transparency creates systematic problems for the project of formulating intuitive and stable epistemic norms. This chapter illustrates how this plays out in the special case of disagreement. It concludes with some tentative remarks about where this might leave the problem of disagreement, and the project of formulating epistemic norms more generally.

Keywords:   disagreement, defeat, knowledge, norms, Angelika Kratzer, luminosity, ought, semantics, transparency, Timothy Williamson

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