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Imagining Women's Careers$
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Laurie Cohen

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199697199

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199697199.001.0001

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The Importance of Others

The Importance of Others

Chapter:
(p.145) 8 The Importance of Others
Source:
Imagining Women's Careers
Author(s):

Laurie Cohen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199697199.003.0008

This chapter examines the role of others in shaping respondents’ careers. Using the typology developed by Bosley, Arnold, and Cohen (2009), it explores the ways in which advisors and informants, gatekeepers and intermediaries, and witnesses shape women’s career world views and career self-concepts. It introduces three additional helper categories: role models, facilitators, and affiliation and social interaction. The chapter also investigates the role of hinderers: from dependents who pose both ideological and material constraints to bullies who undermine, marginalize, and exclude. The significance of both gender and self-employment for the provision and consequences of career help is highlighted. However, the chapter does not depict respondents as wholly malleable in the face of powerful influencers. Rather, they actively negotiate with others’ views and prescriptions with consequences for their career thinking and action. It also highlights some respondents’ strategic use of others as career capital to further their career and business aspirations.

Keywords:   Helpers, hinderers, career world view, career self concept, career shaping influence, impact

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