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Imagining Women's Careers$
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Laurie Cohen

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199697199

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199697199.001.0001

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As in Work, so too in Retirement

As in Work, so too in Retirement

Chapter:
(p.120) 7 As in Work, so too in Retirement
Source:
Imagining Women's Careers
Author(s):

Laurie Cohen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199697199.003.0007

When in 2010 I went back to interview respondents for the second time, the ageing workforce had become a topic of hot debate. On one hand, in response to dismal economic circumstances, organizations were reducing their headcounts. Having built up secure career lives over many years, employees found themselves in circumstances that they would have never envisaged and had few signposts for navigating. On the other hand, those whose jobs were still secure and who had planned to retire at the default age found that this was no longer inevitable. Here again, the future looked very different to how they had once imagined it. This analysis of the eight oldest women in the study illuminates the de-standardization of working life and the heterogeneity of older workers’ experiences and aspirations. Second, it argues that what is being configured is partly structural, partly conceptual and partly a matter of identity work.

Keywords:   reinventing, demographic change, older workers, perspectives, materiality, identity

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