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Network Analysis in ArchaeologyNew Approaches to Regional Interaction$
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Carl Knappett

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199697090

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199697090.001.0001

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13 Old-Boy Networks in the Indigenous Caribbean

13 Old-Boy Networks in the Indigenous Caribbean

Chapter:
(p.306) (p.307) 13 Old-Boy Networks in the Indigenous Caribbean
Source:
Network Analysis in Archaeology
Author(s):

Angus Mol

Jimmy Mans

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199697090.003.0013

Past and present networks in the indigenous Caribbean, consisting of the Caribbean islands and adjoining mainland regions, provide a challenging opportunity for those who want to reconstruct them on the basis of mobile material culture. This chapter presents two case-studies in which the interactions of individuals and communities are modelled as networks using a social network analysis approach with data from (ethno-)archaeological research. One is based on ethnographic data from a small, indigenous village in western Suriname, while the other is based on past insular Caribbean networks, specifically from late pre- and early historic Hispaniola (modern-day Haiti and Dominican Republic). In the former, the intra-site network problems and opportunities faced by a contemporary indigenous leader and his community in Suriname are discussed, on the basis of the observed and accumulated exchange of objects within the boundaries of a single village. Subsequently, the case study building on insular Caribbean historical records continues with a discussion of various pre-colonial actors and their network roles, incorporating the influence of the role of various political specialists.

Keywords:   social network analysis, Suriname, Caribbean networks, Hispaniola

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