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Myth, Truth, and Narrative in Herodotus$

Emily Baragwanath and Mathieu de Bakker

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199693979

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199693979.001.0001

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(p.ix) List of Contributors

(p.ix) List of Contributors

Source:
Myth, Truth, and Narrative in Herodotus
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

  • Mathieu de Bakker is University Lecturer of Ancient Greek at the University of Amsterdam. His research concentrates on Herodotus, Thucydides, and the Greek orators.

  • Emily Baragwanath is Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon. She is the author of Motivation and Narrative in Herodotus (Oxford University Press, 2008), which won Oxford’s Conington Prize and the CAMWS Outstanding Publication Award.

  • Angus M. Bowie is Lobel Praelector in Classics at The Queen’s College, University of Oxford. He was editor of the Journal of Hellenic Studies until 2011, and is now Chairman of the Faculty Board of Classics. He has published widely on the Greek historians, tragedy, comedy, lyric poetry, and Virgil. In 2007 his commentary on Herodotus Book Eight appeared with Cambridge University Press, and he is soon to publish another on Odyssey 13–14.

  • Charles C. Chiasson is Associate Professor and Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Philosophy and Humanities Department at the University of Texas at Arlington, where he directs the Classical Studies programme. His research focuses on archaic and classical Greek literature, and he has published important articles on the relationship between lyric and tragic poetry and Herodotus’ Histories.

  • Carolyn Dewald is Professor of Classical and Historical Studies at Bard College, where she directs the Classical Studies programme. She has published extensively on the Greek historians and is currently working on a Cambridge Commentary to Herodotus Book One together with Rosaria Munson. In 2005 her book Thucydides’ War Narrative: A Structural Study appeared with the University of California Press.

  • Vivienne J. Gray is Professor of Classics at the University of Auckland. Her main areas of interest are Herodotus and Xenophon. She recently edited the Xenophon volume in the Oxford Readings in (p.x) Classical Studies series (2010) and is the author of Xenophon’s Mirror of Princes: Reading the Reflections (Oxford University Press, 2011).

  • Irene de Jong is Professor of Ancient Greek at the University of Amsterdam. She has published extensively on Greek narrative, in particular Homer, tragedy, and the Greek historians. She is editor of the Studies in Ancient Greek Narrative series. In 2011 her commentary on Homer’s Iliad 22 appeared with Cambridge University Press.

  • Rosaria Vignolo Munson is Professor of Classics and Chair of the Department of Classics at Swarthmore College. She is the author of numerous articles and books on Herodotus, among them Telling Wonders: Ethnographic and Political Discourse in the Work of Herodotus (University of Michigan Press, 2001) and Black Doves Speak: Herodotus and the Languages of the Barbarians (Center for Hellenic Studies, 2005). She is currently working on a Cambridge Commentary to Herodotus Book One, together with Carolyn Dewald.

  • Suzanne Saïd is Emeritus Professor of Greek at Columbia University. She has worked on Greek tragedy and comedy, Greek historiography, and the Greek novel. She is co-author of the Short History of Greek Literature (Routledge, 1999) and Greeks on Greekness: Viewing the Greek Past under the Roman Empire (Cambridge University Press, 2006), and in 2011 her Homer and the Odyssey appeared with Oxford University Press.

  • Rosalind Thomas is Dyson–Macgregor Fellow and Jowett Lecturer in Ancient History at Balliol College, University of Oxford. Her research interests concern Greek history, literacy, and historiography of the archaic and classical age, and she has published extensively across these areas. In 2000 her seminal Herodotus in Context: Ethnography, Science and the Art of Persuasion appeared with Cambridge University Press.

  • Elizabeth Vandiver is Clement Biddle Penrose Associate Professor of Latin and Classics and Chair of the Department of Classics at Whitman College. She has worked on Herodotus, mythology, and the reception of classics. In 1991 she published Heroes in Herodotus: The Interaction of Myth and History, and in 2010 her Stand in the Trench, Achilles: Classical Receptions in British Poetry of the Great War appeared with Oxford University Press.

  • (p.xi) Pietro Vannicelli is Associate Professor of Greek History at Sapienza Università di Roma. He is the author of Erodoto e la storia dell’ alto e medio arcaismo (Gruppo Editoriale Internazionale 1993) as well as various articles on Greek history and historiography and is currently working on a commentary on Herodotus Book Seven (p.xii) .