Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Myth, Truth, and Narrative in Herodotus$

Emily Baragwanath and Mathieu de Bakker

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199693979

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199693979.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy). Subscriber: null; date: 25 February 2017

(p.357) General Index

(p.357) General Index

Source:
Myth, Truth, and Narrative in Herodotus
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Achaemenes, 41, 69 n. 22, 265–8, 266 n. 28
Achilles, 97, 163, 275–7, 297, 300 n. 45, 302 n. 52, 306 n. 68
Aeacidae, 39 n. 149, 49 n. 200, 277
Aegeus, 70, 207–8
Aesop, Aesopic fable, 5 n. 12, 43 n. 166, 50, 79–80, 82
Adrastus, 38, 71, 71 n. 29, 82, 135, 145–6, 149 n. 23, 155 n. 46, 157–64, 157 n. 50, n. 52, 158 nn. 56–7, 159 n. 58, 160 n. 61, 162 n. 68, 163 nn. 69–71, 164 n. 74, 226 n. 42
Aeschylus, 5 n. 14, 52–3, 52–3 n. 216, 53 n. 218, 150, 165, 182–3 n. 46, 214 n. 4, 230, 259–60, 262, 296, 301, 301 n. 50, 303, 303 n. 57, 305–8, 305 n. 64, 306 n. 69, 307 n. 74
Aeschylus’ Persians /Persae (and see Index Locorum), 52–3 n. 216, 230, 259, 301, 301 n. 50
aetiology, 32–36, 40, 44, 70, 73, 73 n. 33, 288, see also “myth, aetiological”, “origins”
Agamemnon (for Aeschylus’ Agamemnon, see Index Locorum), 45, 70, 82, 84, 90, 94, 98, 110 n. 12, 114, 118, 150, 153–4, 186 n. 57, 195 n. 2, 272, 281–2, 281 n. 39, 302, 304–5, 304 n. 60, 307
agnōmosunē (‘folly’), 296, 300, 300 n. 49, 301, 307, 307–8 n. 78
ainos (‘praise’), 17, 17 n. 68, 79–80, 79 n. 43
aitiē, aitiai (‘cause(s)’), 20, 40, 62, 65, 67 n. 16, 78, 162, see also “aetiology”
aitios (‘responsible for’, ‘guilty’), 103, 161–2
Alcmaeonids, 35 n. 134
alētheia (‘truth’),see “truth”
Alexander, 91–2, 98, 109–10, 115–6, 118, 120–1, 123, 127, 130, 132–8, 135 n. 29, 136 n. 30, 140, 147, 147 n. 15, 148 n. 19, 151 n. 32, 158 n. 55, 293 n. 22, see also “Paris”
interchangeability with ‘Paris’, 132–3
allusion, 12 n. 48, 48, 52, 87–90, 95, 98–101, 116, 118, 204 n. 27, 260–2, 262 n. 22, 264, 266, 295, 304, 306, 306 n. 71, see also “intertextuality”
alternative/variant version(s), 31, 34, 41–2, 69 n. 22, 109, 127–8, 128 n. 3, 213, 214 n. 3, 228–9, 258, 263–8 (and Ch. 10 passim), 290, 310
Altertumswissenschaft (‘the scholarship of Antiquity’), 3–4
Aly, Wolf4–5, 6
akoē,see “hearsay”
Amazons, 95, 97, 283, 291
ambiguity/ambivalence, 25, 25 n. 98, 44 n. 172, 62, 165 n. 76, 197, 202 n. 23, 263, 303
Amestris, 175
Amompharetus, 290, 309, 312
Amphilytus, 77, 81
analytical vs. unitarian view of Histories, 8, 45, 49–50, 223
Anchises, 81
Andromeda, 20, 91 n. 20, 257, 260, 263, 280
anomiē (‘lawlessness’), 244–5, 249–50
Anonym(o)us Iamblichi, 249
Aphrodite, 73, 77, 81, 91–2, 130, 146, 200 n. 18
Apollodorus (and see Index Locorum), 17, 168–9
Argos/Argives, 38, 41, 73, 167, 167 n. 1, 169, 172–3, 175–8, 177 n. 30, 178 nn. 32–33, 182, 190, 211 n. 44, 256, 259–61, 261 n. 20, 263–6, 278 n. 31, 279–83, 282 n. 42, 285–6, 291 n. 11, 305–6, 308
Arion, 64, 81, 120 n. 38, 136, 138, 172, 189 n. 65
Aristeas, 30
Ariston, 98
Artabanus, 265, 271 n. 10, 296–7, 300, 300 n. 48
Artayctes, 96, 99–101, 199 n. 14, 200, 273–4
(p.358) Artemis, 81, 307 n. 73
Artemisia, 105, 299 n. 44
Artemisium, battle of, 303 n. 57
Assyrians, 91, 244, 259, 267
Astyages, 77, 115, 214–5, 215 n. 8, 217–8, 220–7, 220 nn. 24–5, 224 n. 35, 230
Astydameia, 239
Athamas, 278
Athena, 76, 81, 96, 184–5, 277, 295
Athenian Empire, 84 n. 55, 203, 309 n. 82
Athens/Athenians:20, 25 n. 98, 38, 40, 49 n. 202, 53, 53 n. 218, 68–9, 81–2, 85, 89, 93–5, 97, 100–1, 104 n. 74, 110 n. 13, 117, 117–8 n. 34, 179, 184, 186, 199 n. 14, 202–3, 202 nn. 22–23, 206–7, 206–7 n. 36, 208 n. 39, 211–2, 212 n. 47, 214 nn. 3–4, 248–9, 257, 260, 260 n. 16, 265, 273–4, 277, 277 n. 29, 279, 280 n. 36, 281–4, 282 n. 42, 286, 289–94, 290 nn. 7–8, 293 n. 20, 300–1, 300 n. 49, 302 n. 52, 303–4, 304 nn. 60–1, n. 63, 305 n. 64, 305–6 n. 67, 306 n. 70, 307–8, 310
foundation–myth of, 277
atrekeōs (‘accurately’, ‘clearly’), 34, 120, 139, 188–9
Attic Tragedy,see “Tragedy, Greek/Attic”
Atthis myth, 7 n. 29, 82
Atreus, 222
Atreusmahl (Thyestean feast), 82, 222–3
Atys, 69, 71 n. 29, 77, 82, 135, 155–8, 155–6 n. 46, 157 n. 52, 160, 160 n. 61, 163 n. 69, 164 n. 74, 226 n. 42, 235, 264
Aulis, sacrifice of Iphigeneia at, 101, 114, 153–4
authority, historiographical, 2, 13, 29 ff., 44, 44 n. 176, 51, 57, 78, 90, 92–3, 112 n. 22, 119 n. 36, 119–22, 125, 137, 139, 141–4, 155 n. 45, 164, 189–90, 232, 271, see also “judgement, gnōmē
in recounting myth, 29–37
Babylon, Babylonia, 63, 71, 82, 218
Babylonian god, 68
Babylonian marriage market, 252
Bacchylides (and see Index Locorum), 202, 212
Bias, 50, 79, 167 n. 1, 168–9, 172, 177 n. 30, 285
Bronze Age, 38
Brothers Grimm, 4
Burkert, Walter, 222
Buxton, Richard, 6 n. 19, 9–10, 16–7, 87
Cadmus, 69, 183–6, 189–90, 280 n. 36
Calchas, 280 n. 36, 171 n. 21
Callicrates, 290
Cambridge school of myth and ritual, 15
Candaules, 7 n. 25, 68, 84, 226, 264
Candaules’ wife, 64, 88, 81, 102
Car, 69
Carians, 72, 203–5, 205 n. 28, n. 31, 206–8, 206 n. 33, 206–7 n. 36, 210, 258
Castor and Pollux, 99
Catalogue of Ships, 93, 94, 170
Caucones, 69
Caunians, 73 n. 33, 206, 208 n. 28
Cerberus, 90
change,
cultural, 20–21, 187–8
of name, 20, 207, 255–8, 264
Herodotus’ principle of, 19–23, 20 n. 75
Cheops, 30, 124 n. 46
Chephren, 30, 124 n. 46
Chilon, 79
Cimon, 97
chronology, 22, 24 n. 95, 28, 28 n. 112, 42 n. 161, 70, 90, 107, 156 n. 48, 183, 198 n. 10, 210, 304, see also spatium, “time”
by generations, 28, 28 n. 112
Herodotus’ establishment of, 68 n. 18, 70, 112 n. 21, 145, 264
Cicero, 3
Cimmerians, 32–4, 104 n. 71
Cleobis and Biton, 16, 49, 77, 84, 221 n. 29, 278 n. 32
Cleomenes, 35 n. 134, 98, 116, 182 n. 45, 270
Cleisthenes (of Athens), 38–9, 179, 180 n. 41
Cleisthenes (of Sicyon), 38, 179, 180 n. 41
collective significance of myths, see “myths, collective significance of”
Constitutional Debate,see Index Locorum, Hdt. 3.80–82
(p.359) Corcyreans, 211 n. 44, 249, 279
counterfactuals, 288, 291–2, 311
Crete/Cretans, 28 n. 110, 69, 91, 96 n. 39, 99, 178, 184, 196, 201 n. 20, 206 n. 36, 207 nn. 36–37, 208–11, 209 n. 42, 211 n. 44, 258, 279, 282, 282 n. 42, 298 n. 38
Croesus, 3 n. 6, 27, 28 n. 110, 47, 47 n. 191, 49–50, 60–1, 66, 67 n. 16, 68–9, 71, 71 n. 29, 72 n. 31, 76–7, 76 nn. 38–9, 79–85, 81 nn. 47–8, 82 n. 54, 89, 104–5, 143, 145–6, 149 n. 23, 155–65, 155 n. 46, 156 n. 48, n. 50, 157 n. 54, 158 n. 57, 160 n. 61, 161 nn. 66–7, 162 n. 68, 163 n. 69, n. 72, 164 n. 74, 165 n. 76, 186 n. 57, 212, 214–5, 217, 219, 225–6, 226 n. 42, 229–31, 231 nn. 56–7, 241, 243–4, 302 n. 53
cultic sites, 37
culture hero,
Cyus as, 227
Melampus as, 169 (and Ch. 6 passim)
motif of, 182–90
Cyaxares, 80, 81, 82
Cyrnus, 72–3, 76
Cyrus I (the Great), 5, 27, 27 n. 108, 37, 40, 40 n. 153, 43, 48 n. 197, 54, 59–61, 61 n. 3, 63–4, 63 n. 6, 74, 74 n. 34, 76–7, 79–84, 105, 115, 156, 163, 165 n. 76, Ch. 8 passim, 234 n. 2, 251–2, 265, 267, 270, 287 n. 1, 293 n. 22
Cytissorus, 278
Daiukku, 245
Danae, 82, 91 n. 20, 257, 260, 263
Danaus,
daughters of, 115
Darius, 32, 80, 82, 89, 98, 102, 110 n. 12, 117, 181, 218 n. 19, 229, 229 n. 48, 231 n. 57, 235–6, 236 n. 7, 247 n. 42, 265, 266 n. 28, 267, 270, 272, 296 n. 30
dating, see “chronology”
Deceleans, 289, 291–2
Decelus, 99, 279 n. 34, 289, 291–2
Deioces, 82, 180 n. 41, 218 n. 18, 226, Ch. 9 passim
question of historicity of, 245–8
as example of Greek theory, 248–53
Deiphonus, 284–5
Demaratus, 49 n. 200, 63, 98, 182 n. 45, 263, 270
Demeter, 277 n. 29
Demythologization, see “rationalization”
Deucalion, 69
Dionysius of Halicarnassus, 46, 59
Dionysus, 304 n. 61
rites of, 115, 137 n. 33, 169, 182–4, 183 n. 47, 186–90, 186 n. 54, 190 n. 66
divine, the, see “god(s)”, ta theia
Dorus, 69, 264
dreams, 45, 75, 77, 157, 157 n. 51, 220–1, 224, 230, 231 n. 57, 239, 302
Ecbatana, 245–6, 248
Egypt/Egyptians, 12–3, 21–2, 21 n. 83, 22 n. 87, 24 n. 95, 27–30, 27 n. 109, 28 n. 110, 30 n. 119, 33–4, 33 n. 127, 33 n. 130, 40 n. 155, 42–3, 43 n. 167, 63, 65 n. 12, 71, 76, 89 n. 14, 90–2, 96, 101, 104 n. 74, 107–15, 108 n. 3, 109 nn. 5–6, 110 nn. 8–9, 111 n. 14, n. 16, 112 nn. 1920, n. 22 , 114 nn. 25–27, 117 n. 34, 118–9, 119 n. 36, 122–5, 127–8, 128 n. 4, 129–30, 133, 135, 137–42, 137 n. 33, 140 n. 39, 142 n. 44, 146–7, 147 nn. 14–5, 150, 151 n. 29, 152–5, 153 n. 36, 154 n. 42, 155 n. 44, 169, 169 n. 14, 182–6, 182 n. 46, 183 n. 47, n. 49, 186 n. 54, n. 56, 188–90, 189 n. 63, 190 n. 68, 200 n. 18, 206 n. 34, 218 n. 18, 235 n. 6, 239, 296
as inventors, 114
historical awareness of, 27, 28, 43 n. 167
elegchos (‘refutation’), 13–14
empiricist principles (empiricism), 4, 6, 6 n. 16, 8, 26 n. 104
emplotment of mythic material, 48, 53 n. 217, 220
epairō (‘to incite, exhort’), 50, 230–2, 296
epideixis (sophistic) (‘display performance’), 43, see also “sophists”
epinician poetry, 30, 47, 47 n. 191
epistemological criteria, 18, 18 n. 70, 19
eponyms, 69, 258, 266, 268
epopoiiē (‘the making of epic’), 29, 123
erōs (‘lust’), 98, 102, 305–6, 305 n. 66, 306 n. 68, 309
Etearchus, 116
Ethiopians, 16, 90–1, 142 n. 46, 229, 239
ethnography, 8, 64 n. 9, 72 n. 30, 110 n. 9, 119, 243, 247 n. 42, 252
Euenius, 26 n. 194 , 44–6, 54, 168 n. 10, 178, 221, 285
Euripides (and see Index Locorum), 52, 109, 111, 138, 190 n. 66, 249, 290, 305 n. 64
Europa, 20, 65, 69, 91, 102–3, 198, 210, 256
Euryanax, 309
exitēlos, exitēla (‘extinct’), 21, 62, 66, 115
fiction, 4 n. 9, 50, 125, 233–4, 243, 252
fluidity of identities,see “change”
folktale(s), folklore, 4–5, 11 n. 43, 15, 15 n. 54, 18 n. 69, 61, 64, 81–2, 157 n. 52, 168, 218 n. 20, 246, 251, 270, 273 n. 13
foundation stories, 18, 70
foundation of oracle at Dodona,see “oracle(s), Dodona”
funeral oration(s), 17, 30
Gelon, 39 n. 147, 94, 110 n. 13, 211 n. 44, 281
genealogy, genealogies, 18, 24 n. 95, 68–9, 74, 81, 218 n. 19, 256, 261, 265, 268 (and Chs. 1 and 10 passim)
geneē (‘era’, ‘generation’), 23–4, 88, 142, 196, 196 n. 4, 197 n. 6, 212
genre, 6, 8–10, 17, 30 n. 120, 37, 40 n. 156, 50, 50 n. 204, n. 206, 53, 230, 259, 294, 311, see also “panhellenic genres”
Herodotus’ sensitivity to, 50 n. 206, 51 nn. 209–10, 294 nn. 23–4
of the Histories, 6, 8, 10, 31 n. 121, 43 n. 166, 47–56, 81 n. 49, 123, 143
geography, 38, 70 n. 24, 179, 271, 276, see also “myth, geography and”
geographer(s), 31, see also “Hecataeus”
Gephyrae, 8 n. 27
gnomic sayings (gnomic mots), 78–80
de Gobineau, Arthur, 236 n. 10, 237 n. 11, 239, 240, 242 n. 30
god(s), 15 n. 54, 17, 23, 24 n. 95, 27, 30, 46, 48, 51, 51 n. 209, 60, 62–3, 65–8, 75–8, 80–1, 85, 91, 99–101, 110 nn. 8–9, 111–2, 112 n. 20, 114, 116, 122, 135, 139 n. 38, 140, 144, 146, 147 n. 15, 150–1, 151 n. 29, 153 n. 37, 154, 156–7, 156 nn. 49–50, 160–2, 161 nn. 66–7, 162 n. 68, 164–5, 183, 185, 189–90, 189 n. 63, 195 n. 2, 196–8, 196–7 n. 5, 209, 214, 219–20, 220 n. 24, 225, 231, 231 n. 57, 243, 252, 271, 271 n. 10, 273, 275, 276 n. 23, 282 n. 42, 285–6, 287 n. 1, 296, 302, 306, 306 n. 68, n. 72, 307 n. 74, 307–8 n. 78, see also “religion”, ta theia
Greek/non-Greek binary,
blurring of, 154, 155 n. 44, 208, 280 n. 36, 293
harpagē (‘kidnapping’, ‘theft’), 102, 104, 104 n. 71, 133–4, 133 n. 25, 137, 245
Harpagus, 81–2, 215, 218–26, 226 n. 44
hearsay, akoē, 125, 128, 197, 203–5, 204 n. 27, 210
Hecataeus, 12, 12 n. 48, 13 n. 49, 24 n. 95, 27, 30, 31 n. 124, 50 n. 204, 70 n. 24, 90–1, 90 n. 18, 102, 109, 109 n. 6, 128, 128 n. 3, 147 n. 14, 167, 169 n. 16, 183, 185 n. 53, 258 n. 10
Hegesistratus, 182, 285
Hector, 139–40, 230, 297
Helen (of Troy), 22, 29, 46 n. 187, 47, 47 n. 188, 65, 65 n. 12, 72 n. 31, 89–93, 89 n. 14, 98–101, 103, 109–12, 109 nn. 56, 118, 118 n. 34, 120–3, 123 n. 44, 125, 127–42, 131 n. 17, 133 nn. 24–5, 136 n. 30, 138 n. 34, 140 n. 39, 145 n. 9, 146–7, 146 n. 13, 147 n. 14, 149–55, 151 n. 29, n. 32, (p.361) 152 n. 32, 153 n. 36, 154 n. 42, 162–4, 162 n. 68, 186 n. 56, 197–9, 200 n. 18, 202 n. 22, 203 n. 25, 229, 235 n. 6, 256, 279 n. 34, 282, 288–9, 290 n. 9, 291–5, 309
Helen logos, 47, 127, 129–42, 138 n. 34, 140 n. 39, 145 n. 9, 153 n. 36, 155
Hellen, 69
Hephaestus, 112 n. 19, 275–6
priest of, 124
Heracles, 13, 22–3, 27 n. 109, 32–3, 44, 68, 68 n. 18, 68 n. 20, 89, 91 n. 20, 92, 113, 132, 134, 138–9, 147, 147 n. 15, 168 n. 11, 183, 190, 195 n. 2, 197, 261, 264, 265 n. 26, 270, 276, 276 n. 25, 283, 290
Heraclids (Heraclidae), 63 n. 7, 68–9, 68 n. 20, 95, 171, 172 n. 22, 180, 195 n. 1, 261–6, 283, 303 n. 56
Hermes, 168 n. 11, 276
hero(es), 15, 15 n. 55, 17–8, 24 n. 95, 25 n. 97, 38–9, 39 n. 149, 46, 48, 51, 57, 62–3, 68, 69 n. 22, 72–3, 77, 88, 91, 94, 96, 99–100, 110 n. 12, 112 n. 20, 113, 114 n. 27, 142, 144, 155 n. 44, 157–8 n. 54, 164, 167 n. 1, 168–70, 168 n. 11, 172, 174, 176, 182 ff., 182, 184, 195–7, 195 nn. 1–2, 196–7 n. 5, 200, 202, 221, 225, 227, 232, 244 ff., 245, 247, 255, 258–9, 258 nn. 10–11, n. 13, 264, 265 n. 26, 271, 274, 276–7, 287–91, 287 n. 1, 291 n. 11, 295, 299, 302, see also “culture hero”
cult of, 18, 167, 219
eponymous, 41, 68, 69, 99, 258, 260, 262, 264, 265 n. 26, 266 (and Ch. 10 passim)
Herodotean narrator, 7 n. 22, 31, 43 n. 166, 124 n. 46, 130–2, 131 n. 13, 134–5, 137, 139, 143, 156–7 n. 50, 199, 226 (and passim)
compared with Homeric, 2 n. 1, 30, 30 n. 118, 43 n. 166, 47, 118–21
double aspect of, 42–3, 63–5
credibility of, 2, 13 n. 49
Herodotean ‘paradox,’3, 6, 10, 75 n. 36
Herodotus,
and Egypt,see “Egypt”
and his audience, 2, 12 n. 48, 47–56, 64–5, 68, 70–2, 82–3, 97–8, 140 n. 39, 214, 214 n. 3, 216, 222–3, 243, 247 n. 42, 293, 304, 305 n. 64
and poetry, connections to, 3, 30 n. 120, 47–8, 50–53, 57, 82, 88, 169, 170, 302–3, 305–8, see also “epinician poetry”, “Homer”, “tragedy”
and poetry, divergence from, 26, 30–31, 51, 170, 176, 189, 201 n. 19
authority of, as historian, see “authority, historiographical”
critical arbitration of,see “judgement, gnōmē
focalization, character perspectives, 39 n. 151, 132 n. 18, 137–9, 216–7 n. 15, 294, 308
inquiry, see “enquiry”
‘mythistorical’ technique, 11 n. 42, 225–6, 232
narrative technique, 1–2, 5, 5 n. 12, 7, 7 n. 21, 8, 14–18, 29 n. 115, 31, 36, 40, 49–51, 51 n. 209, 55–6, 57, 59–61, 72 n. 31, 74, 77–8, 81 n. 49, 83–4, 101–2, 105, 107–10, 116–7, 122–5, 132, 135 n. 27, 139, 141–2, 164–6, 167–9, 170, 176, 178–9, 189, 191, 213–4, 225–6, 310–12 (and passim)
sophists and,see “sophists”
sources used by, 4–5, 5 n. 10, 21 n. 81, 26, 30 n. 119, 33–5, 41–2, 48 n. 195, 51, 67 n. 17, 83, 89–90, 125, 128, 139, 141, 143, 146–7, 151, 153 n. 37, 177 n. 30, 183, 183 n. 48, 187, 197 n. 8, 199–200, 201 n. 19, 205, 205 n. 28, 210, 215, 217 n. 16, 225, 227–8, 230, 242–3, see also “source–material”
storytelling, 1, 3, 5 n. 12, 9, 35, 39 n. 151, 48, 55 n. 227, 57, 126, 129–30, 132, 135, 167, 168 n. 7, 169, 176, 188–90, 221, 237–8, 242–3
(p.362) treatment of myth compared to treatment of religious experience, 31–6
heroic age, 25 n. 97, 28 n. 110, 116, 165, 195–6, 196 n. 3, 197–201, 206–8, 210–12, 211 n. 44
separation from human, 123 n. 44, 211–12, see also “spatium, historicum/mythicum
Hesiod, 9–10 n. 39, 12 n. 47, 51, 128, 128 n. 3, 176, 177 n. 30, 202 n. 21, 202 n. 24, 258 n. 10
historic present, 124, 132, 141
historiē, see “enquiry”
Hittite rituals, 236, 238–9, 238 n. 15, 239 n. 18, 240 n. 23, 241, 242 n. 30
Homer, 10 n. 39, 12, 18, 21 n. 82, 23, 29, 30 n. 116, 30 n. 118, 43, 44 n. 176, 45, 47, 50 n. 204, 51, 51 n. 211, 92–4, 97 n. 45, 109 n. 6, 111 n. 14, 111 n. 17, 116, 118–9, 123, 123 n. 44, 127–8, 132–3, 133 n. 24, 139–42, 145, 150, 150 n. 25, 155, 158, 159 n. 59, 162–5, 165 n. 77, 167, 170, 171 n. 21, 176–9, 186 n. 57, 189, 201 n. 19, 202 n. 24, 259, 273, 275–6, 276 n. 23, 282 n. 41, 305 n. 66, 306 n. 69, see also “(Homeric) epic”, Iliad, “Trojan War”
allusion to/ resonance of, in Herodotus, 2 n. 1, 43, 44 n. 175, 47, 51–2, 51 n. 211, 52 n. 212, 55, 64, 64 n. 8, 73, 93–6, 97 n. 45, 105, 109, 111, 123 n. 44, 126, 143–6, 145 n. 10, 150–51, 154–68, 229–30, 271, 271 n. 7, 275–6, 281 n. 40, 288 n. 4, 294–5 n. 24, 296–7, 299–300, 302, 305, 309, 311, 311 n. 87 (and Chs. 2–5 passim)
criticism of or divergence from, in Herodotus, 18, 21 n. 82, 30, 51, 123 n. 44, 133–4, 139–42, 176–8, 271, 276 n. 23, 201 n. 19 (and Ch. 4 passim)
muthos’ in, 16 n. 63
(Homeric) epic, 2, 14 n. 52, 15 n. 55, n. 63, 16 n. 63, 29, 38, 38 n. 144, 44, 44 n. 172, 47–8, 48 n. 195, 50, 51 n. 209, n. 210, 52, 52 n. 213, 57, 64 n. 8, 65, 94, 102, 105, 116, 123, 123 n. 44, 125–6, 133 n. 24, 143–5, 149, 149 n. 21, 151, 155, 157, 157–8 n. 54, 164, 169, 175 n. 25, 176, 178, 201 n. 19, 225 n. 37, 262, 294, 294 n. 24, 295 n. 26, 296–7, 299, 302, 304, see also Iliad, Odyssey
Homeric narrator, compared with Herodotean, see “Herodotean narrator, compared with Homeric”
hospitality,see xenia”
Hyperboreans, 16
Iliad (and see Index Locorum), 7, 15, 15 n. 55, 18, 38 n. 144, 44, 44 n. 172, 52 n. 212, 69, 82, 92, 109, 140–1, 140 n. 41, 162–3, 165 n. 76, 170, 202 n. 24, 207 n. 36, 230, 259, 275, 277, 279, 282, 297, 302, 306 n. 71, 309, see also “Homer”, “Trojan War”
Immerwahr, Henry, 6–7
indirect discourse,see “speech, indirect”
injustice, 27, 134–5, 138, 140, 273
intentional history (“intentionale Geschichte”), 43
interpretatio Graeca, 255, 259
Ionians, 43, 67 n. 16, 73, 79, 104–5, 179, 185, 187, 205 n. 31, 206–7, 258, 283, 291, 295
Ionian Revolt (and see Index Locorum), 44
Jacoby, Felix, 4, 6
Jason, 196–7 n. 5, 259
judgement, gnōmē, 3 n. 3, 36, 51, 63, 67 n. 17, 91, 120, 127–8, 130, 139, 151, 155, 197 n. 8
justice, 40, 99–100, 140, 144 n. 6, 151, 161, 161 n. 67, 245, 247–52, 298, 303 n. 56, 308, 311
Kirk, Geoffrey, 16–7
knowledge, 2, 6, 14 n. 50, 19–29, 21 n. 84, 29 n. 115, 30, 31 n. 125, 33–4 n. 131, 34–5, 40, 42, 49, 51 n. 208, 52 n. 213, 89–90, 101, 103, 105, 118, 119 n. 36, 120, 126, 132 n. 20, 137, 139, 146 (p.363) n. 13, 168, 171 n. 20, 184, 186, 188–91, 188 n. 62, 193, 198, 203 n. 25, 207, 215–6, 224–5, 228, 231 n. 57, 240 n. 26, 243, 252, 269, 294, see also prōtos idmen, “verification, potential for”
elusive character of, 21–2, 36, 50–51, 181, 189, 191, 201, 228, see also “unverifiable material”
legend, 15, 15 n. 54, 19, 36–7, 37 n. 141, 55, 61–2, 64, 66–7, 72–4, 78, 80, 81 n. 48, 83, 88, 110 n. 8, 133, 138, 144, 164, 166, 168 n. 11, 202, 203 n. 25, 233, 245, 287 n. 1
leitmotif, 105, 136
Leleges, 72, 204
Lemnos, 279
Leonidas, 43, 68, 68 n. 20, 181, 261–2, 274 n. 18, 285, 288, 288 n. 4, 297–9, 298 n. 38, 304, 309, 312
Leotychides, 98, 116, 179,
Lichas, 71 n. 26, 73, 81, 173–4
likelihood, argument from,see “probability, argument from”
Livy, 36–7, 37 n. 139, 46 n. 185, 50 n. 206, 51, 239, 292 n. 16
logioi (‘wise men’), logiōtatoi (‘most wise men’), 29, 39, 65–6, 91, 95–6, 104, 151–2, 152 nn. 32–3, 198, 200, 200 n. 18, 291, 312
Persian, 39, 65–6, 91, 96, 104, 151–2, 152 nn. 32–3, 291, 312
logographers, logographoi, 14, 30 n. 120, 169 n. 16,
logoi, 3–4, 7, 7 n. 24, 12 nn. 48–9, 14 n. 51, 41, 60, 61 n. 3, 63–7, 71, 71 n. 28, 74, 83, 122, 135 n. 28, 145–6, 155–6 n. 46, 164–5, 165 n. 76, 195 n. 1, 233–4, 247 n. 41
longue durée, 20
Luwians, 239, 239 n. 18
Lycians, 69–70, 206–8, 210, 258, 280 n. 36
Lycophron, 16, 55, 221 n. 29
Lycurgus, 174, 184, 245
Lycus, 69, 207, 208 n. 39, 280 n. 36
Lydus, 69, 264
lyric, 2, 48, 52, 97 n. 45, 109 n. 6, 168, 176, 178, 286
Mandane, 77, 220, 224
Marathon, battle of, 95, 97, 277 n. 27, 284, 287 n. 1, 291 n. 10
Mardonius, 40, 40 n. 154, 41 n. 158, 43, 43 n. 170, 76–7 n. 39, 193, 199, 214 n. 4, 260–1, 283–5, Ch. 12 passim
Masistes, 102
Masistes’ wife, 5, 175
Massagetae, 32–3, 40, 40 n. 153, 59, 74, 74 n. 34, 80, 84, 214, 217, 219, 227–30, 231 n. 57
Medea, 20, 65, 91, 103, 133 n. 25, 198, 210, 256–7, 259–60, 260 n. 16, 280 n. 36
Medes/Media, 20, 34 n. 131, 40–1, 82, 90, 103, 215–6, 218 n. 18, 219, 221, 223–4, 224 n. 35, 226 n. 42, 233–4, 244–6, 245 n. 33, 248–52, 255–60, 265, 268, 272, 280 n. 36
Melampus, 19 n. 74, 73 n. 32, 97 n. 40, 115, 115 n. 28, 137 n. 33, Ch. 6 passim, 285
Melanippus, 38
Memnon, 90
mē muthōdes (the ‘not–fabulous’), 3, 49, see also muthōdes, to
Menelaus, 90–3, 99, 101, 110, 112–4, 112 n. 18, 116, 117 n. 34, 118–9, 122, 126–7, 130, 132, 134–9, 137 n. 33, 139 n. 36, 140 n. 39, 141–2, 145, 149, 151–5, 153 n. 36, 154 n. 40, 186 n. 57, 209, 211, 281 n. 39, 293 n. 22
Menestheus, 94, 97, 281
metanarrative, 204, 215, 228
Midas, 70–1, 70 n. 25, 71 n. 29
Miltiades, 271 n. 10, 279
Minos, 20 n. 76, 23–7, 25 n. 97, 69–70, 88, 90, 91 n. 20, 96 n. 39, 99, 104 n. 74, Ch. 7 passim, 282, 291 n. 11
(Athenian) discourse on sea power and, 201–8, 209 n. 42
Minotaur, 202, 208 n. 39, 209
Moses, 54, 82
motif, 17, 54, 55 n. 224, 56, 60 n. 2, 61, 71, 79–82, 84, 108, 113, 136, 138, 142, 157, 160, 168, 168 n. 7, 168 n. 11, 184, 186, 188, 199, 214 n. 5, 223 n. 33, 236–7, 239, 239 n. 21, 270, 273, 273 n. 13, 275–6, 275 n. 19, 282, 295–6, 296 n. 28, 298 (p.364) motif,n. 38, 299 n. 43, 307, 311 n. 86, see also “leitmotif”, “mythic patterns/schemata”, “theme(s)”
‘Coyote’-, 80, 80 n. 46, 81 n. 48, see also “motif, trickster”
‘Laius’-, 79
of bargain, 54, 168, 170–8, 175 n. 25, 177 n. 30
of blindness followed by wisdom, 54
of child miraculously saved, 54, 82, 218 n. 20, 218–21, 270
of civilized haves vs. uncivilized have–nots, 79
of deceptive cleverness, 80–1, 223
of enquiring ruler, 119–22, 123 n. 44, 136, 138, 141, 189 n. 65, 215 n. 8
of escalation of conflict, 39
of failing river, 274–6
of first man killed, 273–4
of fraudulent exchange of wives, 270
of Greek conflict, 279–86, 292–3
of harpagē, 102, see also harpagē
of imperfect knowledge, 171 n. 20, 188–9, 191, see also “knowledge, elusive character of”
of lust–impelled conquest, 309
ofnostos (‘return’), 296, 296 n. 30
of quest, 168 n. 11
of reciprocity, 39 , see also “reciprocity”
of revelation of one’s ancestral heritage, 82
of royal Asian wrongdoing vs. Greece, 164–5
of transgression of natural boundaries, 102, 229, 274–5, 275 n. 19
of transmission of names, 186
of thoughtless ruler, 56, 82, 84–5, 165 n. 76, 290, 311 n. 86
of women’s role, 39, 102, 270, see also “women”
of wise adviser/Warner, 79, 79 n. 44, 243 n. 32, 156, see also “Solon”
muthōdes, to (‘the fabulous’), 3 n. 4, 14, 46, 49, 64–5, see also mē muthōdes
muthos (mythos), 1, 9, 9 nn. 38–9, 10–16, 49, 49 n. 201, 60, 87, 144 n. 4, 195 n. 1, 250
vs. logos, 9–10, 11, 14 n. 51, 144 n. 4, 250, see also “myth”
Mycale, 44–5, 48, 277–8 n. 29, 284–5
Mycerinus, 21, 108, 124 n. 46
Mysians, 69, 205 n. 28, 258, 259 n. 14
and Teucrians, invasion of, 90, 96, 103, 104 n. 74, 272
Mysus, 69, 258 n. 13, 108, 124 n. 46
myth,
aetiological, 36, 67–74, 175, 197 n. 7, 269–70
as enlarging significance, 44, 225–6, 232, 295
as example (exemplary function of), 46, 97–105, 118–22, 165, 225
collective significance of, 18, 285–6
colonizing, 18, 55, 73
competitive use of, 278, 285–6
contextualizing function of, 46, 60–61, 70, 73, 83, 108, 226
definitions of, 10–19, 60 n. 2, 75, 195 n. 1, 233, 269 n. 1, 310
distinction between history and, 65, 196–200, 197 n. 6, see also mythos, vs. logos, spatium, historicum/mythicum
eastern, 69, 81, Ch. 9 passim, 270 n. 6
ethnic/ cultural identity and, 18, 20, 20 n. 75, 23, 33, 38, 42–3, 69–70, 73 n. 32, 83, 183 n. 48, 197, 207
explanatory function of, 38, 45–6, 60–61, 73, 83 (and Ch. 1 passim), 214, 250, Ch. 11 passim, 289
genealogical,see “genealogy, genealogies”
geography and, 38, 44, 70–1, 272–8
Greek interpretations of eastern/Persian, 216–17, 243, Chs. 9 and 10 passim
history and, 19–29, 40, 46, 55–6, 193, 199–200, Part II passim
identity and, 18, 20, 33, 37–8, 43, 73 n. 32, 83, 167 n. 1, 197, 207, 286
ideology and, 45, 60 n. 2, 61, 74–82, 75 n. 35, 83–4, 201, 290
motivational and justificatory use of, 31, 40, 73–4, 83, 119 n. 14 , 103, 199, 278–84, 286, 288, 311–12
moral lessons/truths and, 50, 108, 140, 144, 151, 154, 200, 269, 271–2, 274, 285
(p.365) persuasive function of, 41, 43–5, 282 n. 43, 288 n. 2
representation of motivation and, 300–10
timeless aspect of, 49
truth and, 37–47, 114, 193, 195 n. 2, 226 (and Ch. 8 passim), 288
mytheme, 44, 54, 54 n. 221
mythic discourse, 43, 287–8, 294, 296, 300, 312
mythic names, 44 n. 173, 70, 71, 82, 155 n. 46
mythic patterns/schemata, 97–9, 105, 298, see also “motif”, “myth”, “mytheme”, “story‐patterns”
historicity of, 54–6, 84
international, 218 n. 20, 224
of initiation, 16
of threatening child, 221
mythic thinking, 60–1, 85, 193, 289, 294 ff., 294, 299, 309, 311 (and Ch. 12 passim)
mythical origins, see “origins”
narrative mode(s), 43 n. 166, 47 ff., 51
mythic, 9 n. 37, 48–50, 295
prosaic/analytical, 45, 48–9, 223
combination of mythic and analytical/realistic, 64–5, 294–5 n. 24
narrative rhythm, 134, 141
narrative ‘seed’, 135, 199 n. 13
narrative technique,see “Herodotus, narrative technique”
narrator,see “Herodotean narrator”
Neleids, 69
Neleus, 168, 176
nemesis, 71 n. 29, 156, 156 nn. 49–50, 157 n. 50, 160, 163–5
Nestle, Wilhelm, 5 n. 13, 6, 6 n. 20, 9–10, 9 n. 37, 87
Nitocris (Queen of Babylon), 71, 80, 107–8
Nitocris (Queen of Egypt), 71, 124 n. 46
nomos, nomoi (‘custom(s), law(s)’), 20 n. 75, 181, 250–1, see also anomiē
nostos theme,see “motif, of nostos”
novella(e), Ionian, 4–5, 4 n. 9, 5 n. 12, 7, 7 n. 25, 237, 238 n. 14
Ocean, 12–3, 51 n. 208, 123, 275
Oedipus, 49 n. 200, 221–2, 270, see also “Theban Cycle”
Oedipus myth,see “Theban Cycle”
Oeobazus, 236
Odyssey (and see Index Locorum), 101, 109, 118–9, 144, 149, 154 n. 40, 176, 202 n. 24, see also “Homer”
Old Testament (and see Index Locorum), 239
oracle(s), 3 n. 6, 31, 34, 36, 36 n. 138, 38, 51, 67 n. 16, 71 n. 26, 73, 75–7, 75 n. 37, 77 n. 39, 80–1, 96 n. 39, 108, 110, 165 n. 76, 171 n. 20, 173–4, 184, 184 n. 51, 187, 208–11, 211 n. 43, 225, 231, 261–3, 266, 277, 282, 284, 288, 288 n. 3, 297, 297 n. 32, see also “dreams”, “portents”
Amphiaraus, 76, 110 n. 12
Branchidae at Didyma, 76–77
Delphi, 38, 45, 51, 66, 66 n. 14, 70–2, 75 n. 37, 76–7, 76 n. 39, 83, 89, 165 n. 76, 171, 208, 210–1, 225, 231, 241, 266, 279–80, 282, 282 n. 42, 288, 288 n. 3, 297
Dodona, 34–7, 36 n. 138, 45, 76, 182–3 n. 46, 184, 184 n. 51, 187
Zeus Ammon, 34, 76
oral characteristics of Histories, 131, 143–4
orality, oral tradition, 17 n. 67, 21, 41, 53–4, 54 n. 222, 60, 67 n. 17, 72, see also “source–material”, “source reference(s)”
connection to myth, 60 n. 2
Herodotus’ relationship to, 2, 30, 30 n. 120, 49, 213, 294, 304 n. 59
orator(s), 31, 31 n. 121, 41, 43, 93
Orestes, 196, 196 n. 5, 211, 302 n. 52, 305 n. 64
Bones of, 39 n. 146, 70, 72–3, 76, 81, 173–4
origines gentium (‘origins of peoples’), 255, 267
origins, 258–9, see also “aetiology”, “myth, aetiological”
(p.366) of the Carians, 72, 204–5, 210
of the Caunians, 205 n. 28
of the Dorians, 28, 114 n. 26, 206, 207 n. 37, 258, 264–5
of the Lydians, 68–9, 258, 264
of the (kingdom of the) Macedonians, 265, 269–70
of the Medes, 20, 41, 233, 244–52, Ch. 10 passim, 280, 280 n. 36
of the Persians’ rule over Asia, 40, Ch. 8 passim
of the Persian kings, 260, 265–7
of the Persians, 20, 41, 79, 91 n. 20, 233, Ch. 10 passim, 258 n. 10, 259–66, 268, 280, 280 n. 36
of the (royal family of the) Scythians, 32–3, 41, 265 n. 26, 270
of the Spartan kings, 261, 270
Pactyas, 77
Pan, 31 n. 123, 51 n. 210, 183, 287 n. 1, 294 n. 24
Pandion, 69, 208 n. 39, 280 n. 36
panhellenic genres, 52, 294, 305 n. 64, 311
panhellenic myth, 286, 289
Panhellenism, 183 n. 48, 286
paroemiography, 78
Paris, 29, 65, 82 n. 54, 103, 127, 132–5, 135 n. 29, 140, 142, 145–55, 148 n. 20, 152 n. 32, 153 n. 36, 158 n. 55, 164–5, 235 n. 6, 290–1, see also “Alexander”
Parmenides, 10
Pausanias,
author (and see Index Locorum), 17, 97, 112 n. 18, 167 n. 2, 168 n. 11, 169 n. 13, 212 n. 46
Spartan king, 68 n. 20, 263, 285, 309
Pelasgians, 72, 279, 290 n. 7
Peleus, 239, 277, 290 n. 9, 300 n. 45
Peloponnesian War, 46, 85, 88, 98–9, 287, 289
Pelops, 94, 104 n. 74, 278 n. 31, 280–1, 281 n. 39, 302 n. 54
Perdiccas, 174–5
Periander, 16, 81, 120 n. 38, 136, 138, 173 n. 23, 189 n. 65, 221 n. 29, 290 n. 8
Pericles, 273, 293, 304
Perseids, 261–3, 265–7
Perses, 20, 41, 69 n. 22, 91 n. 20, 257, 260–1, 263–5, 267, 280
Perseus, 41, 69 n. 22, 82, 91 n. 20, 114 n. 27, 197 n. 6, 221, 256–68, 260 n. 18, 278 n. 31, 280, 280 n. 36
Persian King, 183, 213, 229, 242, 246, 248 n. 44, 263, 265–7, 270
Persian religious rituals, 239–40, 243
Persian Wars, 3, 22, 29, 31, 31 n. 122, 39, 41, 44, 63, 68 n. 20, 83, 99, 101, 105, 146, 165, 196 n. 3, 198, 209, 226, 256, 259–60, 260 n. 16, 263, 268, 295 n. 26, 298, 304 n. 63
Trojan War as counterpart to, 46, 48, 88, 140–1, 198 n. 10, 199, 271, 311
Persians, 17 n. 67, 20, 40–1, 43, 52–3, 63, 66–7, 73 n. 33, 79, 85, 91 n. 20, 95–7, 101 n. 57, 104, 104 n. 74, 115, 117–8 n. 34, 133 n. 25, 152, 152 n. 33, 170, 179, 181–2, 189, 198–200, 200 n. 18, 210–1, 215–8, 216 nn. 14–6, 223–4, 224 n. 35, 227 n. 45, 232–4, 238, 238 n. 17, 240, 242–3, 243 n. 32, 247, 247 n. 42, 252, 256–68, 257 n. 7, 258 n. 10, 260 n. 19, 273–5, 274 n. 18, 277, 277 n. 27, n. 29, 280, 280 n. 36, 282 n. 42, 291, 293 n. 22, 295–6, 295 n. 26, 298 n. 38, 301, 301 nn. 50–1, 303–4, 304 n. 61, 309–10
personal observation, opsis, 3, 92, 119–21, 124, 128, 130, 130 n. 12, 132, 147 n. 15, 200, 200 n. 18
persuasive function of myth,see “myth, persuasive function of”
Pheretimeē, 296
Pheros, 90–1, 108, 111 n. 14, 124 n. 46, 130 n. 11
Philippides, 51 n. 210, 287 n. 1
Phoenicians, 27, 34–6, 65–7, 69, 96, 103–4, 114 n. 25, 133 n. 25, 152, 184–5, 198–9, 203, 256, 258
Phoenician alphabet, 185–7, 234
Phoenix, 300 n. 45
Phrixus, 278
Pindar, 17 n. 68, 47, 97, 97 n. 45, 176–8, 181, 302
Pisistratids, 207
Pisistratus, 77, 79, 81–2, 93, 104 n. 74, 180 n. 41, 248
Pittacus, 50, 79
Plataea, battle of, 12, 17 n. 68, 30 n. 117, 39, 48, 48 n. 194, 68, 85, 95, 97, 99, (p.367) 110 n. 13, 168, 170–1, 173–4, 176–7, 177 n. 30, 180, 182, 191, 198 n. 10, 199 n. 14, 264, 278 n. 29, 279, 281 n. 38, 282–5, 289–90, 292, 293 n. 19, 296–9, 300 n. 49, 301, 309–10, 311 n. 87
Plato, 10, 14 n. 51, 49, 132, 137 n. 33, 202 n. 23, 240 n. 23, 247, 250, 252, 267
Pohlenz, Max, 6, 7 n. 24
Polycrates, 23–5, 25 n. 97, 88–9, 196, 204, 212, 212 n. 47
Polynices, 221, 283
portents, 61, 75–7, see also “dreams”, “oracles”
predecessors of Herodotus, 47, 167–8 (and Chs. 3–6 passim)
poetic, 2, 26, 123, 259, see also “Homer”
prose, 26, see also “Hecataeus”
Presocratics, 9–10 n. 39, 252
probability (to oikos), argument from, 18, 63, 92, see also “sophists, Histories’ affinities with”
Prodicus, 14 n. 51, 43–4
proem,
of the Histories (and see Index Locorum), 2 n. 1, 3 n. 4, 18 n. 72, 20, 27, 39 n. 151, 41 n. 158, 42, 46–7, 47 n. 193, 61–7, 69, 89, 91 n. 22, 95–6, 95 n. 37, 101–4, 130, 133 n. 25, 151–2, 198–200, 199 n. 11, n. 14, 201 n. 19, 210, 212, 256–7, 256 n. 5, 268, 290–1, 293, 308, 311–2
Proetus, 169, 177 n. 30
propaganda, 30 n. 119, 41, 88, 95–6, 231 n. 57, 260–1, 288, 295 n. 26
Persian use of, 96, 231 n. 57, 247 n. 42, 295 n. 26
Protagoras, 5 n. 13, 14 n. 51, 49, 247, 250, 250 n. 50
Protesilaus, 44, 96, 100, 100 n. 51, 197 n. 5, 200, 200 n. 15, 211, 273–4, 287, 287 n. 1, 293
Proteus, 21, 90–2, Ch. 3 passim, 130, 133 n. 23, 134, 135 n. 29, 136–9, 137 n. 33, 139 n. 36, 141, 142 n. 44, 145–50, 145 n. 9, 148 nn. 18–9, n. 20, 152–5, 153 nn. 36–7, 154 n. 40, n. 43, 158 n. 55, 184 n. 52, 186 n. 56, 235 n. 6
meta-historical function of, 108
revision of, 111
prōtos idmen (‘first of whom we know’), 21, 21 n. 82, 23, 89
proverbs/proverbial wisdom, 50, 301
Pythius the Lydian, 61 n. 3, 117, 117 n. 33, 233, 235–6, 238, 240–1, 242 n. 30, 243–4, 243 n. 32, 246, 248, 252–3
historicity of story of, 240–1 (and Ch. 9 passim)
Quellenforschung (‘the study of sources’), 4
rationalism, 6, 64–5, 90 n. 18, 105, 147 n. 14
rationalization/demythologisation, 19 n. 74, 27, 36, 57, 152, 176, 200
reciprocity, 99, 102, 144, 158, 244, 291, see also “motif, of reciprocity”
religion, 13, 36, 50, 75, 76 n. 38, 112, 114, 114 n. 27, 116, 278, 286, see also “god(s)”, “ritual”
repetition, 77 n. 40, 124, 134–5, 134 n. 26, 135 nn. 28–9, 141, 148, 161, 185, 228, 298
research,see “enquiry”
Rhadamanthus, 206 n. 36, 207 n. 37
Rhampsinitus, 33, 55 n. 224, 90, 108, 124, 130, 131
rhetoric, 9, 23, 40–1, 43, 45, 67 n. 17, 87–8, 93–4, 97, 110, 199, 201, 201 n. 19, 206 n. 35, 212, 247, 281, 282 n. 43, 283–4, 288, 294, 294–5 n. 24, 296–7, 299, 306 n. 71, 311, see also “orator(s)”, “speech”
‘Rise of the rational’ theory, 6, 9
Rite de Passage, 16
ritual, 13, 15–6, 16 n. 57, 16 n. 59, 31–2, 38, 40, 46, 50 n. 203, 54–5, 54 n. 223, 55 n. 227, 114–5, 149, 160 n. 61, 186, 236–43, 238 n. 15, 238 n. 17, 239 n. 18, 240 n. 23, n. 26, 242 n. 30, 246, 270 n. 6, see also “Hittite rituals”, “Persian religious rituals”
ritualistic context, 16
Romulus, 54, 270
Sabakos, 239
saga, 15, 15 n. 54, 17 n. 65, 71 n. 29, 84, 202 n. 21, 208, 246, 255
(p.368) Sandanis, 79
Sappho (and see Index Locorum), 47
Sargon, 216 n. 14, 245, 251, 270
Sarpedon, 69, 91 n. 20, 207, 276
scepticism, 13 n. 49, 34, 64, 195 n. 2, 197 n. 8, 200, 277
Scyllias, 63
Scythia/Scythians, 31–3, 33 n. 128, 33 n. 129, 33–4 n. 131, 40–1, 63, 73, 77, 81, 90, 102–3, 104 n. 74, 229, 265 n. 26, 270, 272
Sesostris, 105, 112 n. 19, 124 n. 46, 183
Seven against Thebes, 95, 283
Sicilian expedition, 294–5 n. 24, 296 n. 28, 306 nn. 69–70, 309
self-mythicizing, 288, 296–7, 299, 300–11
Semiramis, 71
Simonides, 48, 168, 176, 304 n. 63
Plataea Elegy (and see Index Locorum), 17 n. 68, 30 n. 117, 48 n. 194, 97, 198 n. 10, 311 n. 87
Socles, 279, 290 n. 8
Solon, 20, 49–50, 49 n. 201, 78–80, 79 n. 44, 82, 84, 93, 116 n. 30, 117, 117 n. 32, 121, 137 n. 33, 156–7, 156 n. 50, 163, 164 n. 74, 165, 186 n. 57, 220 n. 25, 220 n. 32, 302 n. 53
Sophanes, 290, 293 n. 19, 310
sophists, Histories’ affinities with, 5, 5 n. 13, 6, 8–9, 14 n. 51, 22 n. 85, 43, 101, 151–2 n. 32, 190
Sophocles (and see Index Locorum),
Herodotus and, 5, 52, 222 see also “tragedy, Greek/Attic”
Sosicles,see Socles
source-material,
Assyrian, 71, 245
Cretan, 205, 210–12
Egyptian, 91–2, 107–8, 109 n. 6, 110 n. 8, 111–12, 127–9, 153 n. 37, 190, 200, 210
Persian, 215–16, 218, 229, Ch. 9 passim
transmission of eastern, 111–12, 185, 190, 216–7, 216 n. 14, 220–21, 225, 232, 242–4, 246–9, 251–3 (and Ch. 9 passim), 255
source reference(s), 4, 7–8, 187 n. 59, see also “Herodotus, sources used by”
Egyptian priests as, 33, 90–2, 96, 101, 111, 114 n. 25, 127–9, 131–3, 137, 137 n. 33, 141, 183, 188 n. 62
Sourvinou-Inwood, Christiane, 16 n. 59, 55, 260
Sparta/Spartan(s), 25 n. 98, 39 n. 146, 41, 43, 63, 63 n. 7, 65, 68–71, 73, 73 n. 32–3, 76, 81, 92–4, 98–9, 104 n. 74, 109 n. 6, 110 n. 12, 110 n. 13, 117–8, 134, 146 n. 13, 170–5, 179–82, 184, 191, 196 n. 5, 199 n. 14, 209, 245–6, 260–4, 261 n. 20, 266, 270, 274 n. 18, 279–81, 279 n. 34, 281 n. 39, 282–5, 287–8, 288 n. 4, 289, 289 n. 6, 291–4, 297–9, 303 n. 56, 309–10, 309 n. 83
spatium,
historicum, 2, 24, 24 n. 95, 29, 66, 87–8, 88 n. 8, 90, 110 n. 11, 142 n. 47, 195 n. 1
mythicum, 2, 19, 24, 24 n. 95, 87–8, 88 n. 8, 110 n. 11, 142 n. 47, 195 n. 1 see also “time”
speech, 11 n. 43, 13 n. 49, 16, 36, 52, 78–80, 94–5, 116–7, 124–5, 124 n. 46, n. 48, 130–1, 131 n. 13, n. 17, 158 n. 55, 168, 185, 187, 199 n. 14, 220 n. 24, 222, 221–2 n. 29, 229, 249, 284, 296, 299 n. 44
direct, 116, 124, 131, 131 n. 13, 158 n. 55, 220 n. 24, 222, 249
indirect, 13 n. 49, 31, 34, 36, 37 n. 139, 124, 124 n. 46, 124 n. 48, 125, 131, 131 n. 13, 131 n. 17
Sperthias and Boulis, 98, 117
Stentor, 276
Stoa Poikilē, 97, 291 n. 10
story-patterns (narrative patterns), 44, 47, 54 n. 222, 55–6, 55 n. 224, 61, 64 n. 8, 73 n. 32, 78, 84, 98, 129, 129 n. 9, 131 n. 17, 136, 141–2, 144, 168–70, 172–5, 184, 189–91, 198, 214, 220, 225–7, 232–3, 234 n. 2, 237–8, 251, 270, 285 n. 48, 293 n. 22, 295–6, Ch. 6 passim, see also “motif”, “mythic patterns/schemata”, “theme(s)”
significance of, 236–7
structuralism, 8–9, 17, 54, 54 n. 221
Syagrus, 94, 281
Syracusans, 94, 279, 281, 306 n. 71
(p.369) Talthybius, 90, 98, 110 n. 12, 117, 117–8 n. 35, 211, 287, 287 n. 1
ta theia (‘divine things’, ‘divine doings’), 31, 59, 60
Herodotus’ reticence about, 189
Targitaus, 32
tekmēria (‘evidence’), 27, 27 n. 109, 63
Telemachus, 118–9, 176–7
Tellus, 49, 84, 278 n. 32
thalassocracy, 201 n. 20, 202 n. 24, 204–5, 207 n. 36, 209 n. 42, 212
Thales, 69, 81 n. 48, 116 n. 30
Theban Cycle, 38, 222, 291 n. 11, see also “Oedipus”, “Seven against Thebes”
Thebans, 110 n. 12, 291 n. 11, 300, 306, 310
theme(s), 25, 39, 65, 81–2, 84, 102, 153, 165 n. 76, 174, 177–8, 219, 223, 225 n. 37, 296, 298, 298 n. 38, 301, 301 n. 51, 305, 308, see also “motif”
Themistocles, 179, 271, 277
Theoclymenus, 176–9
Thermopylae, 41, 43, 48, 54 n. 222, 68, 179–80, 261, 263, 285, 288, 288 n. 4, 297 n. 33, 298–9, 298 n. 38, 299 n. 43, 304, 309, 311 n. 87
Theseus, 45 n. 185, 46 n. 187, 55, 69, 90, 97 n. 40, 99, 202, 202 nn. 21–4, 203 n. 25, 207 n. 36, 208, 208 n. 39, 212 n. 46, 248, 260, 279 n. 34, 289–91, 290 n. 9, 291 n. 11, 293–5, 309, 311–2
thōmata (‘wonders’, ‘the miraculous’), 64, 75, 77–8, 83
Thonis, 118, 120, 125, 134–5, 147
thoughtless ruler theme,see “motif, of thoughtless ruler”
Thrasybulus, 64, 81, 173 n. 23
Thucydides, 3, 3 n. 4, 3 n. 5, 7, 7 n. 21, 13–4, 14 n. 51, 18, 20–1, 24 n. 95, 26, 26 n. 103, 28, 30 n. 120, 31 n. 121, 36, 44 n. 176, 46–7, 49, 50 n. 206, 60, 64–5, 67, 78 n. 41, 85, 179, 181, 195–8, 196 n. 3, 197 n. 8, 198 n. 9, 202–7, 202 n. 24, 203 nn. 25–6, 204 n. 27, 205 nn. 30–1, 206 n. 35, 207 nn. 36–7, 212 n. 47, 230 n. 54, 248–9, 259 n. 15, 292 n. 16, 295 n. 24, 296 n. 28, 305–6, 306 n. 69, n. 71, 309
Thucydides’ Archaeology, 21, 198, 198 n. 9, 203, 205 n. 30
Thyestes, 222
time, 1, 9, 14, 19–29, 29 n. 115, 41–2, 46, 49 n. 202, 62, 67, 74, 90, 119 n. 36, 137, 155, 180, 180 n. 40, 188, 195–7, 201, 206, 208, 210, 221–2 n. 29, 271, 284, 287 ff., 292 n. 14, 295, see also spatium, historicum/mythicum
continuity across, 19–20, 22–3, 165
timeless aspect of myth,see “myth, timeless aspect of”
Timesius, 77
Tisamenus, 54, 73 n. 32, Ch. 6 passim
to muthōdes (‘the fabulous’),  see muthōdes, to
Tomyris, 80, 84, 230, 232
to palaion, ta palaia (‘ancient’), 19, 20, 50, 203–4, 208, 283 n. 44
tragedy, Greek/Attic, 9 n. 38, 48, 78 n. 41, 97–8, 225 n. 37, 289, 294, 305 n. 64, see also “Aeschylus”, “Euripides”, “Sophocles”
Histories’ affinities to, 44, 48 n. 195, 50, 52–3, 52 n. 213, 52 nn. 215–6, 79 n. 44, 81, 157, 160 n. 61, 214, 220–25, 227, 230–32, 296, 302–3, 304 n. 61, 306 nn. 68–9, 310
transgression of natural boundaries,see “motif, of transgression of natural boundaries”
Trojan Cycle, 38, 88, 90–1, 93, 98
Trojan War, 15 n. 55, 18, 27–8, 33 n. 130, 39, 46, 46 n. 187, 48, 87–91, 93–101, 96 n. 39, 103, 105, 109, 112, 118, 127–8, 137–8, 137 n. 33, 140–2, 140 n. 40, 151, 151 n. 29, 154–5, 195, 197 n. 8, 198–201, 198 n. 10, 199 n. 14, 200 n. 15, 201 n. 19, 203 n. 25, 207 n. 36, 208–10, 212, 256, 258 n. 11, 271, 273, 286, 291–3, 292 n. 15, 304, 304 n. 63, 309, 311
historicity of, 15 n. 55, 87
Troy, 15, 17–8, 22, 29, 40, 47, 82, 88, 91–3, 96–7, 99–100, 109, 116, 122, 127–8, 135, 135 n. 29, 137–9, 140 n. 39, 146, 150–2, 151 n. 32, 152 n. 32, 154, 158 n. 54, 165, 198–9, 199 n. 14, 200, 206 n. 35, 271–3, 275, 276 n. 24, 278, 280 n. 36, 281–3, 281 n. 39, 287–9, 291–2, 295–6, 295 n. 26, 302–6, 304 n. 60, n. 63, 306 n. 72, 308, 310–11
(p.370) truth (alētheia), 1, 2 n. 2, 3, 5, 11 n. 42, 14, 18 n. 70, 19–20, 26 n. 103, 27–9, 27 n. 108, 32–3, 35–7, 35 n. 134, 40, 42–3, 42 nn. 162–3, 45, 47, 49–50, 55–6, 62–3, 83, 85, 91–2, 97, 104, 115, 119, 119 n. 36, 121–2, 123 n. 44, 126–7, 131–2, 134, 136–8, 137 n. 33, 140, 147, 150, 157, 189, 193, 195, 201, 213–7, 213 n. 1, 214 n. 3, 219, 222, 226–30, 226 n. 44, 227 n. 45, 229 n. 48, 230 n. 53, 232–3 (and Ch. 8 passim), 247, 288, 299, 310
and pleasure, 49–50
Herodotus’ commitment to, 1–3, 18 n. 70, 19–37, 40, 42–3, 46–7, 83–5, 122, 137–8, 189, Part II passim
tyranny, 180 n. 41, 181, 223, 238 n. 17, 244, 246–52, 290 n. 8, 311
unverifiable material, 3–4, 7, 9–10, 14, 21, 23, 26–7, 35, 39, 42, 45, see also “knowledge”
Varro, 28, 89
verification, potential for, 18 n. 70, 33, 164, 287, see also “enquiry”, “authority, historiographical”
verisimilitude, argument from,see “probability, argument from”
Veyne, Paul, 40
Weltanschauung (“world view”), 5–6
Wise-adviser motif,see “motif, of wise adviser/Warner”
xenia (Ionic xeiniē) (‘guest-friendship’, ‘hospitality’), 1, 113, 113 n. 24, 115–7, 116 n. 29, 121, 144–55, 145 n. 8, n. 18, 149 nn. 21–2, 153 n. 36, 157 n. 57, 159–61, 159 n. 60, 160 n. 61, n. 65, 161 n. 66, 163–5, 235 n. 6, 226 n. 42, 243–4, see also “Zeus, Xenios
Xerxes, 5, 20, 40, 40 n. 154, 43–5, 43 n. 170, 44 n. 172, 52–3 n. 216, 68, 82 n. 54, 88, 88 n. 6, 95–6, 96 n. 39, 98, 100–1, 105, 117, 141, 164–5, 175, 193, 199–200, 199 n. 14, 206 n. 33, 208–9, 218, 220, 229–30, 235–6, 236 n. 7, 237–8, 241–4, 241 n. 29, 257–60, 257 n. 8, 258 n. 11, 262–3, 262 n. 22, 265–6, 269, 271–80, 276 n. 23, 278 n. 31, 280 n. 36–7, 286–8, 292, 294–7, 295 n. 25, 299–301, 299 n. 44, 301 n. 51, 303 n. 56, 308, 308 n. 80, 310–1
army list of, 257 ff., 257–60, 264
invasion of, 95, 100, 200, 209, 266, 273, 277, 310
sacrifice of Oebazus’ sons, 237 n. 11
Zeus, 13, 32–5, 32 n. 126, 69, 76, 91 n. 20, 144, 147 n. 16, 150, 161, 161 nn. 66–7, 187, 197, 205 n. 28, 257, 261–3, 271, 275, 278, 288 n. 3, 302, 307
Xenios, 147 n. 16, 150, 161, 161 n. 66