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How Fighting EndsA History of Surrender$
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Holger Afflerbach and Hew Strachan

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199693627

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199693627.001.0001

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How Fighting Ends: Asymmetric Wars, Terrorism, and Suicide Bombing

How Fighting Ends: Asymmetric Wars, Terrorism, and Suicide Bombing

Chapter:
(p.417) 26 How Fighting Ends: Asymmetric Wars, Terrorism, and Suicide Bombing
Source:
How Fighting Ends
Author(s):

Audrey Kurth Cronin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199693627.003.0028

In campaigns involving suicide terrorism, individual operatives and parent societies can rarely ‘surrender’ in the conventional wartime sense; however, terrorist organizations sometimes terminate their campaigns. The reasons why they do so are widely misunderstood. This overview begins with the Assassins and moves through the history of suicide terrorism. It explains the surprising findings of research done on hundreds of modern groups, with case studies on the Tamil Tigers (LTTE) and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict examined in greater depth. The conclusion discusses the unique challenges, especially for democracies, of compelling groups that use suicide terrorism to end their operations and surrender.

Keywords:   suicide, terrorists, negotiations, assassins, Hezbollah, Tamil Tigers, Israeli-Palestinian

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