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Understanding Other MindsPerspectives from developmental social neuroscience$
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Simon Baron-Cohen, Michael Lombardo, and Helen Tager-Flusberg

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199692972

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199692972.001.0001

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A review of theory of mind interventions for children and adolescents with autism spectrum conditions

A review of theory of mind interventions for children and adolescents with autism spectrum conditions

Chapter:
(p.413) Chapter 23 A review of theory of mind interventions for children and adolescents with autism spectrum conditions
Source:
Understanding Other Minds
Author(s):

Julie A. Hadwin

Hanna Kovshoff

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199692972.003.0023

Theory of Mind (ToM) involves the understanding that others can have mental states, (thoughts, intentions and beliefs) that are separate from one’s own and that these are linked to feelings and behaviours in oneself and others. The emergence of TOM is argued to mark a conceptual change in thinking early in childhood that has been linked to language and social development. Individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASCs) have, however, shown delays and difficulties in ToM development and some researchers have suggested that these are associated with poorer language and social outcomes in this group. Consequently, interventions have been developed to teach ToM to children and young people with ASCs. We review the diverse approaches and effectiveness of interventions that have aimed to teach ToM to children and adolescents with ASCs. Furthermore, we also review studies that have aimed to teach skills argued to act as developmental precursors or prerequisites to ToM, such as joint attention. Limitations with current research and suggestions for future directions are also highlighted.

Keywords:   Theory of Mind, ToM, Autism, Intervention, Joint Attention, Review

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