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Population in the Human SciencesConcepts, Models, Evidence$
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Philip Kreager, Bruce Winney, Stanley Ulijaszek, and Cristian Capelli

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199688203

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199688203.001.0001

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Population Structure and Public Health Research on HIV Control in Sub-Saharan Africa

Population Structure and Public Health Research on HIV Control in Sub-Saharan Africa

Chapter:
(p.517) Chapter 18 Population Structure and Public Health Research on HIV Control in Sub-Saharan Africa
Source:
Population in the Human Sciences
Author(s):

Simon Gregson

Timothy B. Hallett

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199688203.003.0019

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been a major public health disaster in sub-Saharan Africa since the late 1970s. Early projections of HIV epidemics in Africa and their likely demographic consequences were criticized for failing to account for population age structure. With hindsight, age structure per se had relatively little influence on the size of epidemics. However, other aspects of population structure—particularly heterogeneities in sexual behaviour—have been key determinants in the scale and temporal dynamics of HIV epidemics. This chapter explains how an understanding of the influence of population structure on the dynamics of HIV epidemics is important in understanding observed trends in national epidemics, in evaluating the effectiveness of national control programmes, and in prioritizing intervention efforts.

Keywords:   public health, HIV, population structure, epidemiology, sub-Saharan Africa

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