Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Human-Wildlife Conflict
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Human-Wildlife Conflict: Complexity in the Marine Environment

Megan Draheim, Francine Madden, Julie-Beth McCarthy, and Chris Parsons

Abstract

Human–wildlife conflict has classically been defined as a situation where wildlife impacts humans negatively (physically, economically, or psychologically), and where humans likewise negatively impact wildlife. However, there is growing consensus in the human–wildlife conflict community that the conflict between people about wildlife is as much a part of human–wildlife conflict as is the conflict between people and wildlife. Human–wildlife conflict not only affects the conservation of one species in a certain geographic area but also impacts an individual’s, community’s, and society’s desire t ... More

Keywords: human–wildlife conflict, conservation conflict transformation, marine conservation, levels of conflict, marine mammals, marine protected areas, conservation, conflict model

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2015 Print ISBN-13: 9780199687145
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2015 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199687145.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Megan Draheim, editor
Visiting Assistant Professor, Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability, Virginia Tech

Francine Madden, editor
Executive Director, Human-Wildlife Conflict Collaboration (HWCC)

Julie-Beth McCarthy, editor
independent researcher

More
Show Summary Details

Contents

View:

Section 1 Introduction to the Levels of Conflict

Section 2 Policy and Human–Wildlife Conflict

2 Conservation on Island Time

Catherine Booker and d’Shan Maycock

4 Conservation in Conflict

Christine Gleason

Section 3 Narratives and Human–Wildlife Conflict

7 Hawaiian Monk Seals

Rachel S. Sprague and Megan M. Draheim

8 Flipper Fallout

Carlie Wiener

End Matter