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Ancient Economies of the Northern AegeanFifth to First Centuries BC$
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Zosia Halina Archibald

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199682119

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682119.001.0001

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Regionalism and regional economies

Regionalism and regional economies

Chapter:
(p.192) (p.193) 5 Regionalism and regional economies
Source:
Ancient Economies of the Northern Aegean
Author(s):

Zosia Halina Archibald

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682119.003.0005

This chapter explores how ideas of ‘regionalism’, as defined by geographers, as well as historians, can be applied to the north Aegean economic ‘super-region’. Charting distributions of artefacts from the last five centuries bc (including coin types originating from maritime and inland sites; the distribution of metals with a distinctive technological signature; as well as the more familiar ceramic amphorae of identifiable forms), we can detect the inter-connected nature of the east Balkan landmass. Surviving artefacts reflect the particular bilateral forms of exchange documented in the sparse written sources referred to in Chapter 1. Far from being a continuous or uniform pattern, relations between bilateral agents fluctuated and changed, in concert with a range of other socio-political factors. The key role of Thasos as an exporter and transmitter of commodities, fashions, and skills, from maritime Aegean to continental Balkan areas, was supplanted by Rhodes and other producers in the southern Aegean, while Byzantion increasingly monopolized the passage of goods into and out of the Black Sea.

Keywords:   regionalism, distribution patterns, amphorae, royal monopolies, regional historiography, ethnographic geography, salt, Pella, Pistiros, Krastevich

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