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The Age of the EfendiyyaPassages to Modernity in National-Colonial Egypt$
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Lucie Ryzova

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199681778

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199681778.001.0001

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Passages to Modernity

Passages to Modernity

Chapter:
(p.139) 4 Passages to Modernity
Source:
The Age of the Efendiyya
Author(s):

Lucie Ryzova

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199681778.003.0004

This chapter focuses on narratives of young men, sons of the “traditional” families discussed in the previous chapter. It looks at the experience of “becoming modern” as a particular classed and gendered social experience, as well as one enacted through a specific genre of texts: modern Egyptian autobiography. In these texts, life histories are framed as linear journeys from “tradition” and towards middle-class modernity. This chapter looks at the generational dimension of such autobiographical acts and their shared narrative strategies: departure and personal metamorphosis, often presented as a matter of struggle and self-education, and the role “traditional” parents and places of origin play in these texts.

Keywords:   Egyptian modernity, middle Class, modern Egyptian men, efendi, efendiyya, autobiography, social mobility, becoming modern, education, self-education, nationalism, tradition, authenticity

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