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Handbook of Trade Policy for Development$
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Arvid Lukauskas, Robert M. Stern, and Gianni Zanini

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199680405

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199680405.001.0001

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Trade Facilitation and Development

Trade Facilitation and Development

Chapter:
(p.877) Chapter 28 Trade Facilitation and Development
Source:
Handbook of Trade Policy for Development
Author(s):

Andrew Grainger

Gerard Mclinden

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199680405.003.0028

The high costs and administrative difficulties associated with outdated and excessively bureaucratic border-clearance processes are now, for most developing countries, regarded as more important barriers to international trade and competitiveness than tariffs as they result in high transaction costs, long delays in the clearance of imports, exports, and transit goods, and present significant opportunities for administrative corruption. There is now widespread agreement that trade-facilitation reform is a win-win agenda, but many developing and least-developed countries face capacity and resource constraints preventing them from improving their trade-facilitation infrastructure and institutions. Moreover, while improving the performance of customs remains a high priority, evidence suggests it is often responsible for no more than a third of delays. Achieving meaningful trade facilitation gains therefore requires comprehensive “whole of border” reform initiatives and cooperation and information sharing among all border management agencies, including those dealing with health, agriculture, quarantine, police, immigration, standards, etc.

Keywords:   Trade facilitation, logistics, border clearance and processing, transit, corruption, import and export delays, border management agencies

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