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Handbook of Trade Policy for Development$
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Arvid Lukauskas, Robert M. Stern, and Gianni Zanini

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199680405

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199680405.001.0001

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Trade, Poverty, Inequality, and Gender

Trade, Poverty, Inequality, and Gender

Chapter:
(p.467) Chapter 15 Trade, Poverty, Inequality, and Gender
Source:
Handbook of Trade Policy for Development
Author(s):

Francisco L. Rivera-Batíz

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199680405.003.0015

Francisco Rivera-Batìz examines the impact of international trade on poverty and income distribution. He analyses the leading theories on the connections involving trade, poverty, and inequality and examines the indicators used to measure trends in these variables. He reports support for the view that trade liberalization is associated with reductions in poverty, but this finding is sensitive to the poverty threshold used and other factors have also contributed to reductions in poverty. Increased trade is associated with a period of rising income inequality within countries, in part because since the 1980s it has been associated with skill-biased technical change that increases demand for high-skilled labour relative to unskilled workers. In contrast, trade has not had a systematic effect on poverty or inequality on the basis of gender, although its impact in individual countries has been substantial.

Keywords:   Trade, poverty, inequality, gender, econometrics, liberalization, technical change, skilled labor, unskilled labor

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