Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Institutionalizing State ResponsibilityGlobal Security and UN Organs$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Vincent-Joël Proulx

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199680399

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199680399.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 October 2017

State Responsibility and Global Security in the Light of Unforeseen Transnational Phenomena

State Responsibility and Global Security in the Light of Unforeseen Transnational Phenomena

Chapter:
(p.39) 2 State Responsibility and Global Security in the Light of Unforeseen Transnational Phenomena
Source:
Institutionalizing State Responsibility
Author(s):

Vincent-Joël Proulx

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199680399.003.0004

This chapter investigates the problematic question of State support of terrorism, with some consideration of how a sanctuary State’s tacit support, toleration, acquiescence, or logical support of terrorism, which may all amount to its failure in preventing transnational strikes, may affect the deployment of secondary norms under State responsibility repertoire. It then explores how contemporaneous events, particularly the response to 9/11, have effectively merged or conflated certain aspects of State responsibility with use of force repertoire. The chapter concludes by analysing the prospects and limits of State responsibility in tackling other global security threats such as global warming and climate change along with the phenomenon of ungoverned spaces, whilst engaging the notions of risk assessment and precautionary approaches.

Keywords:   State responsibility, State-supported terrorism, attribution, use of force, climate change, environmental degradation, ungoverned spaces, precautionary approaches, cyberterrorism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .