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Nature in the BalanceThe Economics of Biodiversity$
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Dieter Helm and Cameron Hepburn

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199676880

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199676880.001.0001

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The UK National Ecosystem Assessment: Valuing Changes in Ecosystem Services 1

The UK National Ecosystem Assessment: Valuing Changes in Ecosystem Services 1

Chapter:
(p.79) 5 The UK National Ecosystem Assessment: Valuing Changes in Ecosystem Services1
Source:
Nature in the Balance
Author(s):

Ian J. Bateman

Grischa Perino

David Abson

Barnaby Andrews

Andrew Crowe

Steve Dugdale

Carlo Fezzi

Jo Foden

David Hadley

Roy Haines-Young

Amii Harwood

Mark Hulme

Andreas Kontoleon

Paul Munday

Unai Pascual

James Paterson

Antara Sen

Gavin Siriwardena

Mette Termansen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199676880.003.0005

The chapter summarizes work conducted under the UK National Ecosystem Assessment and the ESRC SEER project. This synthesizes valuation studies of the effects of land-use change on agricultural output, greenhouse gases, open-access recreation, and urban greenspace. All effects are valued in economic terms and contrasted with an assessment of the costs of maintaining present levels of biodiversity. The valuation models are spatially explicit, revealing the effect that underlying variation in the natural environment has on mitigating or exacerbating effects. Various scenarios of change are appraised over an extended period of time. Results suggest that sole adherence to the maximization of market values can lead to net losses when other impacts are assessed. In contrast, changes which emphasize both market and non-market effects can yield substantially greater benefits for society.

Keywords:   UK National Ecosystem Assessment, valuation studies, agricultural output, greenhouse gases, biodiversity, scenarios, market value, greenspaces

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