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Harvesting the SeaThe Exploitation of Marine Resources in the Roman Mediterranean$
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Annalisa Marzano

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199675623

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199675623.001.0001

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Oysters and Other Shellfish

Oysters and Other Shellfish

Chapter:
(p.173) 6 Oysters and Other Shellfish
Source:
Harvesting the Sea
Author(s):

Annalisa Marzano

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199675623.003.0007

This chapter discusses the evidence for oyster farming in the Roman period and the techniques used. It shows that the Romans used two basic techniques to capture oyster larvae and grow them in more suitable environments: the posts and rope technique and the tile technique. Both techniques have been used, with minimal modifications, until recent times. Literary texts report only anecdotal information on oyster farming, but archaeological evidence shows that oyster farming and the exploitation of natural oyster beds were distinct features of the Roman era in various parts of the empire. The chapter also examines the evidence for the farming of other molluscs besides oysters, and the transport and distribution of fresh oysters found at sites located at great distance from the sea.

Keywords:   oysters, oyster farming, tile technique, posts and rope technique, oyster transport

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