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Quantitative Genetics in the Wild$
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Anne Charmantier, Dany Garant, and Loeske E. B. Kruuk

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199674237

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199674237.001.0001

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Quantitative genetic approaches to understanding sexual selection and mating system evolution in the wild

Quantitative genetic approaches to understanding sexual selection and mating system evolution in the wild

Chapter:
(p.34) Chapter 3 Quantitative genetic approaches to understanding sexual selection and mating system evolution in the wild
Source:
Quantitative Genetics in the Wild
Author(s):

Jane M. Reid

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199674237.003.0003

Major ambitions in evolutionary biology are to understand the forces that drive the evolution and persistence of mate choice, and of associated primary and secondary sexual traits and emergent mating systems. Particular uncertainty, and hence substantial research interest, concerns the degree to which ongoing evolution of diverse morphological, physiological and behavioural traits and mating systems could be caused or constrained by indirect selection stemming from genetic covariation between such traits and associated mating preferences and fitness components. This chapter highlights the virtues of a quantitative genetic approach to answering such questions, in terms of both deriving pertinent theory and explicitly testing such theory in wild populations experiencing natural genetic and environmental variation. Two case studies are used, which aim to dissect the coevolution of a female mating preference and ornamental male trait in collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) and the evolution of female extra-pair reproduction in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia), to illustrate the opportunities afforded by a wild population quantitative genetic approach to understanding sexual selection and mating system evolution, but also to illustrate the substantial remaining challenges.

Keywords:   extra-pair reproduction, indirect selection, mate choice, mating preference, mating system, secondary sexual trait

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